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Titolo:
Singing and hearing: neuronal mechanisms of acoustic communication in Orthopterans
Autore:
Hedwig, B;
Indirizzi:
Univ Cambridge, Dept Zool, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, England Univ Cambridge Cambridge England CB2 3EJ ool, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, England
Titolo Testata:
ZOOLOGY-ANALYSIS OF COMPLEX SYSTEMS
fascicolo: 3-4, volume: 103, anno: 2001,
pagine: 140 - 149
SICI:
0944-2006(2001)103:3-4<140:SAHNMO>2.0.ZU;2-F
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
OMOCESTUS-VIRIDULUS L; ACRIDID GRASSHOPPER; STRIDULATORY BEHAVIOR; COMMAND NEURON; PLURISEGMENTAL INTERNEURONS; CRICKET STRIDULATION; BRAIN; PHYSIOLOGY; GANGLION; CHORUSES;
Keywords:
brain; command neurons; neuropil; motor control; sound processing;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
40
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Hedwig, B Univ Cambridge, Dept Zool, Downing St, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, England Univ Cambridge Downing St Cambridge England CB2 3EJ EJ, England
Citazione:
B. Hedwig, "Singing and hearing: neuronal mechanisms of acoustic communication in Orthopterans", ZOOL-AN COM, 103(3-4), 2001, pp. 140-149

Abstract

Sound production in crickets and grasshoppers is controlled by identified descending brain neurons. The dendritic arborizations of these neurons occupy different brain regions in the two groups. In crickets, the dendrites project within the anterior protocerebrum, between the alpha -lobe and the pedunculus whereas in grasshoppers the dendrites form a profuse arborization within the posterior dorsal neuropil. These neuropil areas are regarded as "stridulatory" neuropils. The descending neurons function as command neurons, since their activity is both sufficient and necessary for the occurrenceof calling song stridulation. Furthermore changes in the interneuron discharge rate can modulate the intensity of stridulatory motor output. Local brain neurons, which can also release stridulation, may link the ascending auditory pathway to the descending command neurons. In both, crickets and grasshoppers, microinjection of acetylcholine and cholinergic agonists into the "stridulatory" neuropils can release stridulation. In sonorously stridulating crickets the auditory neuron ON1 is excited by self-generated sound patterns but simultaneously receives inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. Furthermore, it responds to sound stimuli presented in the interchirp interval. Also in silently singing crickets, ON1 receives an effective inhibition in phase with the chirp pattern, which diminishes any auditory response of the interneuron towards sound stimuli. The data indicate that crickets employ a neural mechanism, to reduce the response of theirauditory pathway to self-generated sound patterns.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 23/01/20 alle ore 12:50:29