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Titolo:
Socioeconomic disparities in health change in a longitudinal study of US adults: the role of health-risk behaviors
Autore:
Lantz, PM; Lynch, JW; House, JS; Lepkowski, JM; Mero, RP; Musick, MA; Williams, DR;
Indirizzi:
Univ Michigan, Sch Publ Hlth, Observ 109, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA Univ Michigan Ann Arbor MI USA 48109 Observ 109, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA Univ Michigan, Inst Social Res, Survey Res Ctr, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA Univ Michigan Ann Arbor MI USA 48109 vey Res Ctr, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA Univ Michigan, Dept Sociol, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA Univ Michigan Ann Arbor MI USA 48109 Dept Sociol, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA Univ Texas, Dept Sociol, Austin, TX 78712 USA Univ Texas Austin TX USA 78712 v Texas, Dept Sociol, Austin, TX 78712 USA
Titolo Testata:
SOCIAL SCIENCE & MEDICINE
fascicolo: 1, volume: 53, anno: 2001,
pagine: 29 - 40
SICI:
0277-9536(200107)53:1<29:SDIHCI>2.0.ZU;2-#
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SELF-RATED HEALTH; CORONARY HEART-DISEASE; ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY; INCOME INEQUALITY; SOCIAL-CLASS; UNITED-STATES; EDUCATION; POPULATION; DIFFERENTIALS; ASSOCIATION;
Keywords:
socioeconomic disparities; poverty; health status change; health-risk behaviors; longitudinal studies; USA;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
46
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Lantz, PM Univ Michigan, Sch Publ Hlth, Observ 109, Room M3116, Ann Arbor,MI 48109 USA Univ Michigan Room M3116 Ann Arbor MI USA 48109 or, MI 48109 USA
Citazione:
P.M. Lantz et al., "Socioeconomic disparities in health change in a longitudinal study of US adults: the role of health-risk behaviors", SOCIAL SC M, 53(1), 2001, pp. 29-40

Abstract

This study investigated the hypothesis that socioeconomic differences in health status change can largely be explained by the higher prevalence of individual health-risk behaviors among those of lower socioeconomic position. Data were from the Americans' Changing Lives study, a longitudinal survey of 3617 adults representative of the US noninstitutionalized population in 1986. The authors examined associations between income and education in 1986, and physical functioning and self-rated health in 1994, adjusted for baseline health status, using a multinomial logistic regression framework thatconsidered mortality and survey nonresponse as competing risks. Covariatesincluded age, sex, race, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and Body Mass Index. Both income and education were strong predictors of poor health outcomes. The four health-risk behaviors under study statistically explained only a modest portion of the socioeconomic differences in health at follow-up. For example, after adjustment for baseline healthstatus, those in the lowest income group at baseline had odds of moderate/severe functional impairment in 1994 of 2.11 (95% C.I.: 1.40, 3.20) in an unadjusted model and 1.89 (95% C.I.: 1.23, 2.89) in a model adjusted for health-risk behaviors. The results suggest that the higher prevalence of majorhealth-risk behaviors among those in lower socioeconomic strata is not thedominant mediating mechanism that can explain socioeconomic disparities inhealth status among US adults. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Documento generato il 31/03/20 alle ore 22:41:11