Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Social influences on health-risk behaviors among minority middle school students
Autore:
Beal, AC; Ausiello, J; Perrin, JM;
Indirizzi:
Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Child & Adolescent Hlth Policy, Dept Pediat, Boston, MA 02114 USA Massachusetts Gen Hosp Boston MA USA 02114 t Pediat, Boston, MA 02114 USA Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Hlth Policy Res & Dev Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA Massachusetts Gen Hosp Boston MA USA 02114 Dev Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENT HEALTH
fascicolo: 6, volume: 28, anno: 2001,
pagine: 474 - 480
SICI:
1054-139X(200106)28:6<474:SIOHBA>2.0.ZU;2-7
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
COMPROMISING BEHAVIORS; ABUSE PREVENTION; UNITED-STATES; ADOLESCENTS; SMOKING; INITIATION; ALCOHOL; PROGRAM; IMPACT; YOUTH;
Keywords:
parent influence; peer influence; social influence; tobacco; alcohol; sexual activity; drug use; health-risk behaviors; adolescents; minority;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
30
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Beal, AC Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Child & Adolescent Hlth Policy, Dept Pediat, 50 Staniford St,Suite 901, Boston, MA 02114 USA Massachusetts Gen Hosp 50 Staniford St,Suite 901 Boston MA USA 02114
Citazione:
A.C. Beal et al., "Social influences on health-risk behaviors among minority middle school students", J ADOLES H, 28(6), 2001, pp. 474-480

Abstract

Purpose: To determine whether parent social influences are associated withhealth-risk behaviors more than peer social influences among young minority adolescents. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of seventh-grade students in a public urban magnet middle school using a survey instrument adapted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Youth Risk Behavior Survey. The sample consisted of all seventh-grade students in the school, and thesurvey was part of a needs assessment for a school-based health education program. We measured four health-risk behaviors: use of (a) tobacco, (b) alcohol, (c) onset of sexual activity, and (d) marijuana use; and five socialinfluences: (a) parent disapproval of health-risk behaviors, (b) parent modeling of health-risk behaviors, (c) parent monitoring of health-risks, (d)peer disapproval of health risks, and (e) peer modeling of health-risk behaviors. The analyses included measures of the prevalence of health-risk behaviors, bivariate analyses to evaluate relationships between health-risk behaviors and social influences, and regressions analyses to determine the independent associations of thesocial influences with the four health-risk behaviors. Results: Twenty percent of respondents reported using tobacco, over 50% used alcohol in the past year, 13.3% were sexually active, and 12% reported marijuana use. Parentinfluences were associated with differences in alcohol use, whereas peer influences were associated with differences in all measured health-risk behaviors: tobacco and alcohol use, sexual activity, and marijuana use. Regression analyses demonstrated that peer social influences were the only measures independently associated with abstinence from tobacco (p < .05), alcohol (p < .01), sexual activity (p < .05), and marijuana use (p < .05). In all analyses, peers emerged as the most consistent social influence on health-risk behavior. Conclusion: This study suggests peers and peer group behavior may be better predictors of adolescent health-risk behaviors than parental social influences among young adolescents. (C) Society for Adolescent Medicine, 2001.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 30/03/20 alle ore 10:11:08