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Titolo:
Getting to the canopy: Tree height growth in a neotropical rain forest
Autore:
Clark, DA; Clark, DB;
Indirizzi:
Univ Missouri, Dept Biol, St Louis, MO 63121 USA Univ Missouri St Louis MO USA 63121 ri, Dept Biol, St Louis, MO 63121 USA
Titolo Testata:
ECOLOGY
fascicolo: 5, volume: 82, anno: 2001,
pagine: 1460 - 1472
SICI:
0012-9658(200105)82:5<1460:GTTCTH>2.0.ZU;2-L
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
TROPICAL FOREST; MORTALITY PATTERNS; AMAZONIAN ECUADOR; COSTA-RICA; TERRESTRIAL; CARBON; RATES; DISTRIBUTIONS; BIODIVERSITY; ECOSYSTEMS;
Keywords:
Costa Rico; inherent growth capacity; La Selva; ontogenetic switching; physical damage; pioneers; tree height growth; tree regeneration; tropical rain forest; suppression; growth of juvenile trees;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
48
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Clark, DA INTERLINK 341, La Selva Biol Stn, POB 02-5635, Miami, FL 33102 USA INTERLINK 341 POB 02-5635 Miami FL USA 33102 Miami, FL 33102 USA
Citazione:
D.A. Clark e D.B. Clark, "Getting to the canopy: Tree height growth in a neotropical rain forest", ECOLOGY, 82(5), 2001, pp. 1460-1472

Abstract

There is still limited understanding of the processes underlying forest dynamics in the world's tropical rain forests, ecosystems of disproportionateimportance in terms of global biogeochemistry and biodiversity. Particularly poorly documented are the nature and time scale of upward height growth during regeneration by the tree species in these communities. In this study, we assessed long-term height growth through ontogeny For a diverse group of canopy and emergent tree species in a lowland neotropical rain forest (the La Selva Biological Station, northeastern Costa Rica). Species were evaluated based on annual height measurements of large samples of individuals in all postseedling size classes, over a 16-yr period (> 11000 increments). The study species were seven nonpioneers (Minquartia guianensis. Lecythis ampla, Hymenolobium mesoamericanum, Simarouba amara, Dipteryx panamensis, Balizia elegans, and Hyeronima alchorneoides) and two pioneers (Cecropia obtusifolia and Cecropia insignis). For each species, inherent height growth capacity was estimated as the mean of the five largest annual height increments (from different individuals) in each juvenile size class (from 50 cm tall to 20 cm in diameter). All species showed marked ontogenetic increases inthis measure of height growth potential. At all sizes, there were highly significant differences among species in height growth potential. The two Cecropia species consistently showed the highest observed maximum height increments as smaller juveniles (less than or equal to4 cm in diameter). Among the nonpioneers, Simarouba had the highest growth potential across all juvenile sizes. For all species, mean annual height increments in all juvenile size classes were very much lower than the species' potential growth rates and reflected the impacts of frequent periods of zero growth and major height losses from physical damage. Because of the same factors, maximum net height increments declined over increasing measurement intervals (1-15-yr periods). With only one exception (Simarouba amara saplings less than or equalto1 cm in diameter that survived 10 yr), the annual height growth increments of these species showed no significant temporal autocorrelation. For theseven nonpioneer species, we estimated the minimum time required to grow from 50 cm tall saplings to 10 cm diameter trees, based on their greatest net height increments over increasing intervals. Estimated passage times increased from 7-33 yr, when based on maximum 5-yr height increments, to 37-83 yr, when based on maximum net height growth over 15 yr for the six longest studied (nonpioneer) species. Given the erratic height growth trajectories found for these juvenile trees in this 16-yr study, it is clear that much longer term observation is required. Still unknown are the actual growth trajectories that characterize successful regeneration in each of our focal species, how much time successful trees spend as suppressed juveniles, and the number of times they experience and recover from major physical damage.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 16/01/21 alle ore 05:44:59