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Titolo:
Modulating semantic feedback in visual word recognition
Autore:
Smith, MC; Besner, D;
Indirizzi:
Univ Toronto, Div Life Sci, Scarborough, ON M1C 1A4, Canada Univ Toronto Scarborough ON Canada M1C 1A4 carborough, ON M1C 1A4, Canada Univ Waterloo, Dept Psychol, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada Univ Waterloo Waterloo ON Canada N2L 3G1 ol, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
Titolo Testata:
PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW
fascicolo: 1, volume: 8, anno: 2001,
pagine: 111 - 117
SICI:
1069-9384(200103)8:1<111:MSFIVW>2.0.ZU;2-6
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SPREADING ACTIVATION; AUTOMATIC PROCESSES; LEXICAL ACCESS; FREQUENCY; CONTEXT; SET; DISSOCIATION; BLOCKING; MODEL; TASK;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
42
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Smith, MC Univ Toronto, Div Life Sci, Scarborough, ON M1C 1A4, Canada UnivToronto Scarborough ON Canada M1C 1A4 , ON M1C 1A4, Canada
Citazione:
M.C. Smith e D. Besner, "Modulating semantic feedback in visual word recognition", PSYCHON B R, 8(1), 2001, pp. 111-117

Abstract

According to the interactive activation framework proposed by McClelland and Rumelhart (1981), activation spreads both forward and backward between some levels of representation during visual word recognition. An important boundary condition, however, is that the spread of activation from lower to higher levels can be prevented (e.g., explicit letter processing during prime processing eliminates the well-documented semantic priming effect). Can the spread of activation from higher to lower levels also be prevented? This question was addressed with a choice task procedure in which subjects read a prime word and then responded to a target, performing either lexical decision or letter search depending on the color of the target. A semantic context effect was observed in lexical decision, providing evidence of semantic-level activation. In contrast, there was no semantic context effect in the letter search task, despite evidence of lexical involvement: Words were searched faster than nonwords. Further evidence of lexical involvement in the letter search task appeared in Experiment 2 in the form of greater identity griming for words than for nonwords. The results of these experiments are consistent with the conclusion that feedback from the semantic level to the lexical level can be blocked. Hence, between-level activation blocks can be instantiated in both bottom-up and top-down directions.

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Documento generato il 05/04/20 alle ore 23:03:14