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Titolo:
Motor neurone disease, dementia and aphasia: coincidence, co-occurrence orcontinuum?
Autore:
Bak, TH; Hodges, JR;
Indirizzi:
MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge CB2 2EF, England MRC Cambridge England CB2 2EF Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge CB2 2EF, England Univ Cambridge, Addenbrookes Hosp, Neurol Unit, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, EnglandUniv Cambridge Cambridge England CB2 2QQ nit, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, England
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY
fascicolo: 4, volume: 248, anno: 2001,
pagine: 260 -
SICI:
0340-5354(200104)248:4<260:MNDDAA>2.0.ZU;2-3
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
AMYOTROPHIC-LATERAL-SCLEROSIS; POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY; RAPIDLY PROGRESSIVE APHASIA; FRONTAL-LOBE DEGENERATION; FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA; PRESENILE-DEMENTIA; COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT; SUPEROXIDE-DISMUTASE; COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY; ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE;
Keywords:
motor neurone disease; fronto-temporal dementia; progressive aphasia;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
111
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Bak, TH MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, 15 Chaucer Rd, Cambridge CB2 2EF, England MRC 15 Chaucer Rd Cambridge England CB2 2EF idge CB2 2EF, England
Citazione:
T.H. Bak e J.R. Hodges, "Motor neurone disease, dementia and aphasia: coincidence, co-occurrence orcontinuum?", J NEUROL, 248(4), 2001, pp. 260

Abstract

Cognitive,and particularly aphasic, symptoms associated with motor neuronedisease (MND) are still frequently described as rare and "recently discovered". This review demonstrates that the association between MND and dementia was described and recognised as an entity as early as 1929, and its closerelationship to Pick's disease was postulated in 1932. Changes in languageproduction and comprehension were also observed by early authors, althoughthey were rarely described as aphasia. The striking similarity to the contemporary descriptions is, however, sometimes obscured by diverging terminology. The syndromes of MND/dementia and MND/aphasia are well established butrepresent a comparatively small subgroup of MND. In addition, subtle cognitive alterations have also been reported in non-demented MND patients; moststudies have found evidence of frontal-executive dysfunction, similar in pattern, but much milder than in patients with frank MND/dementia. These findings are strengthened further by post-mortem studies demonstrating pathological changes in the frontal lobes, and functional neuroimaging studies, showing reduced frontal activation. The issue of whether memory, visuospatialskills and language are affected in non-demented subjects remains, however, controversial. Further studies are required to establish whether MND/dementia and MND/aphasia form separate disease entities or can be viewed as extreme forms of a cognitive deficit characteristic of MND in general.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 29/11/20 alle ore 03:02:25