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Titolo:
Conditioning film and environmental effects on the adherence of Candida spp. to silicone and poly(vinylchloride) biomaterials
Autore:
Jones, DS; McGovern, JG; Adair, CG; Woolfson, AD; Gorman, SP;
Indirizzi:
Queens Univ Belfast, Ctr Med Biol, Sch Pharm, Med Devices Unit, Belfast BT9 7BL, Antrim, North Ireland Queens Univ Belfast Belfast Antrim North Ireland BT9 7BL m, North Ireland
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE-MATERIALS IN MEDICINE
fascicolo: 5, volume: 12, anno: 2001,
pagine: 399 - 405
SICI:
0957-4530(2001)12:5<399:CFAEEO>2.0.ZU;2-X
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
COAGULASE-NEGATIVE STAPHYLOCOCCI; CELL-SURFACE HYDROPHOBICITY; CARBON-DIOXIDE; IN-VITRO; VOICE PROSTHESES; FUNGAL COLONIZATION; ENDOTRACHEAL-TUBES; BIOFILM FORMATION; SALIVA; ADHESION;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
37
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Jones, DS Queens Univ Belfast, Ctr Med Biol, Sch Pharm, Med Devices Unit, 97 LisburnRd, Belfast BT9 7BL, Antrim, North Ireland Queens Univ Belfast 97Lisburn Rd Belfast Antrim North Ireland BT9 7BL
Citazione:
D.S. Jones et al., "Conditioning film and environmental effects on the adherence of Candida spp. to silicone and poly(vinylchloride) biomaterials", J MAT S-M M, 12(5), 2001, pp. 399-405

Abstract

The reported incidence of colonization of oropharyngeal medical devices with Candida spp. has increased in recent years, although few studies that have systematically examined the adherence of yeast cells to such biomaterials, the primary step in the process of colonization. This study, therefore, examined the effects of oropharyngeal atmospheric conditions (5% v/v carbondioxide) and the presence of a salivary conditioning film on both the surface properties and adherence of Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida tropicalis to PVC and silicone. Furthermore, the effects of the salivary conditioning film on the surface properties of these biomaterials are reported. Growth of the three Candida spp. in an atmosphere containing 5% v/v CO2 significantly increased their cell surface hydrophobicity and reduced thezeta potential of C. albicans and C. krusei yet increased the zeta potential of C. tropicalis (p <0.05). Furthermore, growth in 5% v/v CO2 decreased the adherence of C. tropicalis and C. albicans to both PVC and silicone, however, increased adherence of C. krusei (p <0.05). Pre-treatment of the microorganisms with pooled human saliva significantly decreased their cell surface hydrophobicity and increased their adherence to either biomaterial in comparison to yeast cells that had been pre-treated with PBS (p <0.05). Saliva treatment of the microorganisms had no consistent effect on microbial zeta potential. Interestingly, adherence of the three, saliva-treated Candida spp. to saliva-treated silicone and PVC was significantly lower than whenever the microorganisms and biomaterials had been treated with PBS (p <0.05). Treatment of silicone and PVC with saliva significantly altered the surface properties, notably reducing both the advancing and receding contact angles and, additionally, the microrugosity. These effects may contribute to the decreased adherence of saliva-treated microorganisms to these biomaterials. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated the effects of physiological conditions within the oral cavity on the adherence of selected Candida spp. to biomaterials employed as oropharyngeal medical devices. In particular, this study has ominously shown that these materials act as substrates foryeast colonization, highlighting the need for advancements in biomaterial design. Furthermore, it is important that physiological conditions should be employed whenever biocompatibility of oropharyngeal biomaterials is underinvestigation. (C) 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 29/03/20 alle ore 08:00:36