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Titolo:
Vitamins/minerals and genomic stability in humans
Autore:
Fenech, M; Ferguson, LR;
Indirizzi:
CSIRO Hlth Sci & Nutr, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia CSIRO Hlth Sci & NutrAdelaide SA Australia 5000 aide, SA 5000, Australia Univ Auckland, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Discipline Nutr & ACSRC, Auckland 1, New Zealand Univ Auckland Auckland New Zealand 1 tr & ACSRC, Auckland 1, New Zealand
Titolo Testata:
MUTATION RESEARCH-FUNDAMENTAL AND MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF MUTAGENESIS
fascicolo: 1-2, volume: 475, anno: 2001,
pagine: 1 - 6
SICI:
1386-1964(20010418)475:1-2<1:VAGSIH>2.0.ZU;2-1
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
MULTIVITAMIN USE; CANCER; POLYMORPHISMS; PREVENTION; DISEASE; HEALTH; WOMEN; RISK; DIET;
Keywords:
vitamin; mineral; polyphenol; genomic instability; DNA damage; gene mutation; chromosome aberrations; micronuclei;
Tipo documento:
Editorial Material
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
21
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Fenech, M CSIRO Hlth Sci & Nutr, POB 10041,Gouger St, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia CSIRO Hlth Sci & Nutr POB 10041,Gouger St Adelaide SA Australia 5000
Citazione:
M. Fenech e L.R. Ferguson, "Vitamins/minerals and genomic stability in humans", MUT RES-F M, 475(1-2), 2001, pp. 1-6

Abstract

Recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) of micronutrients have been traditionally derived as those levels necessary to prevent symptoms of deficiency diseases. There is increasing evidence that higher levels of many such micronutrients may be necessary for various DNA maintenance reactions, and that the current RDAs for some micronutrients may be inadequate to protect against genomic instability. Supplementation of a normal diet, with either vitamins and/or minerals or with isolated plant polyphenols, is becoming increasingly common in most Western populations. However, there is no clear agreement as to how much supplementation should occur, if at all, and genotypic differences are not accounted for. The 14 mini-reviews in this special issuesummarise the role of specific micronutrients in various aspects of DNA maintenance: DNA synthesis, DNA repair, DNA methylation, gene mutation, chromosome breakage, chromosome segregation, gene expression, oxidative stress, necrosis and apoptosis. Evidence has been collated from mammalian and humanexperiments, both using in vitro cultures and in vivo approaches. Authors were asked to critically assess the strength of evidence as to whether the micronutrient can affect genomic stability in humans at realistic intake levels, and to estimate optimal dietary ranges where possible. Information onfurther research necessary is also documented, These reviews are an essential step towards a definition of RDAs designed to maintain genomic stability. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 11/07/20 alle ore 18:28:19