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Titolo:
Curriculum assessment for prevention topics and the population perspective
Autore:
Dismuke, SE; Burns, BW; Moranetz, CA; Ellerbeck, E;
Indirizzi:
Univ Kansas, Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Wichita, KS 67214 USA Univ KansasWichita KS USA 67214 Dept Prevent Med, Wichita, KS 67214 USA Univ Kansas, Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Kansas City, KS USA Univ Kansas Kansas City KS USA ed, Dept Prevent Med, Kansas City, KS USA
Titolo Testata:
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
fascicolo: 4, volume: 20, anno: 2001,
pagine: 286 - 290
SICI:
0749-3797(200105)20:4<286:CAFPTA>2.0.ZU;2-6
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Keywords:
education, medical, undergraduate; curriculum; competency-based education; health promotion;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
7
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Dismuke, SE Univ Kansas, Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1010 N Kansas, Wichita, KS 67214 USA Univ Kansas 1010 N Kansas Wichita KS USA 67214 a, KS 67214 USA
Citazione:
S.E. Dismuke et al., "Curriculum assessment for prevention topics and the population perspective", AM J PREV M, 20(4), 2001, pp. 286-290

Abstract

Background: According to the Association of American Medical College's (AAMC) Senior Questionnaire, medical students spend an inadequate amount of time learning about health promotion, disease prevention, and the population health perspective. Objective: Determine the health promotion/disease prevention (HPDP) content of the medical school curriculum at the University of Kansas School of Medicine, using an inventory of knowledge and skills in HPDP and using physician education objectives from Healthy People 2000. Methods: A 121-item survey to evaluate curriculum content was developed. All course directors evaluated their course by using this instrument. An average of three medical students used this instrument to assess each curriculum lecture and every clinical clerkship day in the required medical school curriculum. A teaching session was defined as spending a minimum of 3-5 minutes teaching an HPDP topic. Results: Of 21 required courses in the medical school curriculum, 11 accounted for the 393 teaching sessions in HPDP. Seventy-five percent (293 sessions) of these dealt with clinical prevention. Quantitative methods received40 sessions, whereas the health services organization and delivery and thecommunity dimensions of medical practice received 37 and 23 sessions, respectively. Course directors and students disagreed significantly in which HPDP topics were taught in the curriculum. Conclusions: Clinical prevention was fairly well covered in the medical school curriculum. Quantitative methods, health services organization and delivery, and community dimensions of medical practice were poorly covered. This assessment was used to substantially improve the curriculum. To track and improve curriculum content in all courses, course directors need to know more precise details about the content of their courses, so this detail canbe used to better evaluate the overall curriculum.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 01/04/20 alle ore 00:56:29