Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Maximizing treatment outcome in depression - Strategies to overcome socialstigma and noncompliance
Autore:
Stimmel, GL;
Indirizzi:
Univ So Calif, Sch Pharm, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA Univ So Calif Los Angeles CA USA 90089 h Pharm, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA Univ So Calif, Sch Med, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA Univ So Calif Los Angeles CA USA 90089 Sch Med, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA
Titolo Testata:
DISEASE MANAGEMENT & HEALTH OUTCOMES
fascicolo: 4, volume: 9, anno: 2001,
pagine: 179 - 186
SICI:
1173-8790(2001)9:4<179:MTOID->2.0.ZU;2-C
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
PRIMARY-CARE; MAJOR DEPRESSION; CONSENSUS STATEMENT; UNDERTREATMENT; PREVALENCE; SAMPLE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
24
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Stimmel, GL Univ So Calif, Sch Pharm, 1985 Zonal Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA Univ So Calif 1985 Zonal Ave Los Angeles CA USA 90089 0089 USA
Citazione:
G.L. Stimmel, "Maximizing treatment outcome in depression - Strategies to overcome socialstigma and noncompliance", DIS MANAG H, 9(4), 2001, pp. 179-186

Abstract

Despite a wealth of national treatment guidelines, algorithms, and clinical literature detailing the successful treatment of patients with depressivedisorders, there remains a large gap between what is known to be ideal treatment of depression and the reality of current practice, Depression in primary care settings continues to be under-recognized, and when diagnosed, isoften inadequately treated. A host of factors contribute to this concern, including both patient and clinician factors, The fundamental approach to narrowing this gap and improving treatment outcome in patients with depressive disorders is one of education. Public education initiatives have sought, to lessen the stigma associated with depression and its treatment. Professional education efforts have beenprimarily directed toward improving diagnostic skills and increased use ofscreening tools. Individual patient education approaches focus on specificinformation such as onset of antidepressant effect, expected duration of therapy, identification and correction of patients' misconceptions about depression and antidepressants, and discussion of what to do if adverse effects occur. Such interventions can all contribute to a more successful treatment outcome for depressive disorders. Successful treatment of patients with depressive disorders requires both precision in diagnosis and careful monitoring and 'fine tuning' of pharmacotherapy over time by the clinician. The patient requires adequate education regarding their disorder, the associated symptoms, and appropriate expectations about treatment outcome. National practice guidelines and an extensiveclinical literature clearly define the characteristics of successful diagnosis and treatment of patients with depressive disorders. However, there remains a tremendous gap between the ideal of antidepressant clinical trial data efficacy and the reality of actual antidepressant treatment outcome. This paper identifies factors contributing to that gap, and explores ways to narrow it. The lifetime prevalence of major depression in the US, based on a nationalcommunity sample, was 17.1% among people aged from 15 to 54 years.([1]) Using the 1-year prevalence rates from the Epidemiologic Catchment Area program, it was estimated that there were 11 million people in the US with depression in 1990; 7.8 million women and 3.2 million men.([2])More recently, attention has focused on the social functioning and well-being of patients with depression rather than just on the symptoms of depression that lead to a diagnosis. Rating scales to assess social functioning inantidepressant clinical trials have only recently been utilized. Despite some variation in definitions and measurement of social function domains, these rating scales generally allow an assessment of occupation, household role, marital functioning, parental role, family/kinship role, social role, leisure/general interest, and self-care. Inclusion of such quality-of-life assessments, in addition to depressive symptom assessment, allows a more comprehensive understanding of how depression may influence a patient's perception of their illness and compliance with prescribed treatment.([3])

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 29/02/20 alle ore 14:57:40