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Titolo:
Vaccination strategies for mucosal immune responses
Autore:
Ogra, PL; Faden, H; Welliver, RC;
Indirizzi:
Childrens Hosp, Div Infect Dis, Dept Pediat, Buffalo, NY 14222 USA Childrens Hosp Buffalo NY USA 14222 s, Dept Pediat, Buffalo, NY 14222 USA Childrens Hosp Buffalo, Buffalo, NY USA Childrens Hosp Buffalo Buffalo NYUSA rens Hosp Buffalo, Buffalo, NY USA
Titolo Testata:
CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY REVIEWS
fascicolo: 2, volume: 14, anno: 2001,
pagine: 430 -
SICI:
0893-8512(200104)14:2<430:VSFMIR>2.0.ZU;2-P
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS; EXPERIMENTAL AUTOIMMUNE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS; COLLAGEN-INDUCED ARTHRITIS; RESIDENT INTESTINAL FLORA; NONOBESE DIABETIC MICE; MYELIN BASIC-PROTEIN; ORAL TOLERANCE; IMMUNOGLOBULIN-A; LYMPHOID-TISSUE; DENDRITIC CELLS;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
140
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Ogra, PL Childrens Hosp, Div Infect Dis, Dept Pediat, 219 Bryant St, Buffalo, NY 14222 USA Childrens Hosp 219 Bryant St Buffalo NY USA 14222 o, NY 14222 USA
Citazione:
P.L. Ogra et al., "Vaccination strategies for mucosal immune responses", CLIN MICROB, 14(2), 2001, pp. 430

Abstract

Mucosal administration of vaccines is an important approach to the induction of appropriate immune responses to microbial and other environmental antigens in systemic sites and peripheral blood as well as in most external mucosal surfaces. The development of specific antibody- or T-cell-mediated immunologic responses and the induction of mucosally induced systemic immunologic hyporesponsiveness (oral or mucosal tolerance) depend on complex sets of immunologic events, including the nature of the antigenic stimulation ofspecialized lymphoid structures in the host, antigen-induced activation ofdifferent populations of regulatory T cells (Th1 versus Th2), and the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines. Availability of mucosal vaccines will provide a painless approach to deliver large numbers of vaccine antigens for human immunization. Currently, an average infant will receive 20 to 25 percutaneous injections for vaccination against different childhood infections by 18 months of age. It should be possible to develop for human use effective, nonliving, recombinant, replicating, transgenic,and microbial vector- or plant-based mucosal vaccines to prevent infections. Based on the experience with many dietary antigens, it is also possible to manipulate the mucosal immune system to induce systemic tolerance against environmental, dietary, and possibly other autoantigens associated with allergic and autoimmune disorders. Mucosal immunity offers new strategies toinduce protective immune responses against a variety of infectious agents. Such immunization may also provide new prophylactic or therapeutic avenuesin the control of autoimmune diseases in humans.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 21/09/20 alle ore 12:37:06