Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Hadza meat sharing
Autore:
Hawkes, K; OConnell, JF; Jones, NGB;
Indirizzi:
Univ Utah, Dept Anthropol, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA Univ Utah Salt Lake City UT USA 84112 ropol, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Anthropol, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA Univ Calif Los Angeles Los Angeles CA USA 90024 Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Psychiat, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA Univ Calif Los Angeles Los Angeles CA USA 90024 Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA Univ Calif Los Angeles, Grad Sch Educ, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA Univ Calif Los Angeles Los Angeles CA USA 90024 Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA
Titolo Testata:
EVOLUTION AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR
fascicolo: 2, volume: 22, anno: 2001,
pagine: 113 - 142
SICI:
1090-5138(200103)22:2<113:HMS>2.0.ZU;2-O
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
ACHE HUNTER-GATHERERS; BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY; TOLERATED THEFT; FORAGING GOALS; EVOLUTION; RECIPROCITY; FORAGERS; DIET; COOPERATION; GENEROSITY;
Keywords:
meat sharing; reciprocity; hunter-gatherers; cooperation; men's foraging goals; showing off;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
89
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Hawkes, K Univ Utah, Dept Anthropol, 270 S 1400 E,Room 102, Salt Lake City, UT 84112USA Univ Utah 270 S 1400 E,Room 102 Salt Lake City UT USA 84112 2USA
Citazione:
K. Hawkes et al., "Hadza meat sharing", EVOL HUM BE, 22(2), 2001, pp. 113-142

Abstract

In most human foraging societies, the meat of large animals is widely shared. Many assume that people follow this practice because it helps to reducethe risk inherent in big game hunting. In principle, a hunter can offset the chance of many hungry days by exchanging some of the meat earned from a successful strike for shares in future kills made by other hunters. If hunting and its associated risks of failure have great antiquity, then meat sharing might have been the evolutionary foundation for many other distinctively human patterns of social exchange. Here we use previously unpublished data from the Tanzanian Hadza to test hypotheses drawn from a simple version of this argument. Results indicate that Hadza meat sharing does not fit theexpectations of risk-reduction reciprocity. We comment on some variations of the "sharing as exchange" argument; then elaborate an alternative based partly on the observation that a successful hunter does not control the distribution of his kill. Instead of family provisioning, his goal may be to enhance his status as a desirable neighbor. If correct, this alternative argument has implications for the evolution of men's work. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 10/07/20 alle ore 12:47:39