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Titolo:
Cholesterol metabolism in the brain
Autore:
Dietschy, JM; Turley, SD;
Indirizzi:
Univ Texas, SW Med Ctr, Dept Internal Med, Dallas, TX 75390 USA Univ Texas Dallas TX USA 75390 r, Dept Internal Med, Dallas, TX 75390 USA
Titolo Testata:
CURRENT OPINION IN LIPIDOLOGY
fascicolo: 2, volume: 12, anno: 2001,
pagine: 105 - 112
SICI:
0957-9672(200104)12:2<105:CMITB>2.0.ZU;2-X
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN RECEPTOR; LEMLI-OPITZ-SYNDROME; APOLIPOPROTEIN-A-I; AMYLOID PRECURSOR PROTEIN; CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM; KNOCKOUT MICE LACKING; PICK C1 PROTEIN; ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE; NEURITE OUTGROWTH; SYNTHESIS INVIVO;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
73
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Dietschy, JM Univ Texas, SW Med Ctr, Dept Internal Med, Dallas, TX 75390 USA Univ Texas Dallas TX USA 75390 nal Med, Dallas, TX 75390 USA
Citazione:
J.M. Dietschy e S.D. Turley, "Cholesterol metabolism in the brain", CURR OP LIP, 12(2), 2001, pp. 105-112

Abstract

The central nervous system accounts for only 2% of the whole body mass butcontains almost a quarter of the unesterified cholesterol present in the whole individual. This sterol is largely present in two pools comprised of the cholesterol in the plasma membranes of glial cells and neurons and the cholesterol present in the specialized membranes of myelin. From 0.02% (human) to 0.4% (mouse) of the cholesterol in these pools turns over each day sothat the absolute flux of sterol across the brain is only approximately 0.9% as rapid as the turnover of cholesterol in the whole body of these respective species. The input of cholesterol into the central nervous system comes almost entirely from in situ synthesis, and there is currently little evidence for the net transfer of sterol from the plasma into the brain of thefetus, newborn or adult. In the steady state in the adult, an equivalent amount of cholesterol must move out of the brain and this output is partly accounted for by the formation and excretion of 24S-hydroxycholesterol. Thischolesterol turnover across the brain is increased in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Niemann-Pick type C disease, Indirect evidence suggests that large amounts of cholesterol also turn over amongthe glial cells and neurons within the central nervous system during braingrowth and neuron repair and remodelling. This internal recycling of sterol may involve ligands such as apolipoproteins E and Al, and one or more membrane transport proteins such as members of the low density lipoprotein receptor family. Changes in cholesterol balance across the whole body may, in some way, cause alterations in sterol recycling and apolipoprotein E expression within the central nervous system, which, in turn; may affect neuron and myelin integrity. Further elucidation of the processes controlling theseevents is very important to understand a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. Curr Opin Lipidol 12:105-112. (C) 2001 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 27/01/20 alle ore 07:24:28