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Titolo:
Physiologic instability in panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder
Autore:
Wilhelm, FH; Trabert, W; Roth, WT;
Indirizzi:
Stanford Univ, Dept Psychiat & Behav Sci, Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA StanfordUniv Palo Alto CA USA 94304 & Behav Sci, Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA Dept Vet Affairs Hlth Care Syst, Palo Alto, CA USA Dept Vet Affairs Hlth Care Syst Palo Alto CA USA Syst, Palo Alto, CA USA
Titolo Testata:
BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY
fascicolo: 7, volume: 49, anno: 2001,
pagine: 596 - 605
SICI:
0006-3223(20010401)49:7<596:PIIPDA>2.0.ZU;2-M
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
NONINVASIVE CARDIAC-OUTPUT; HYPERVENTILATION; ATTACKS; RELAXATION; PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY; AGORAPHOBIA; VARIABILITY; RESPIRATION; BREATH; BLOOD;
Keywords:
anxiety disorders; panic attacks; respiration; autonomic nervous system; arousal; stroke volume;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
45
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Wilhelm, FH Stanford Univ, Dept Psychiat & Behav Sci, VAP-AHCS 116F PAD,3801 Miranda Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA Stanford Univ VAP-AHCS 116F PAD,3801 Miranda Ave Palo Alto CA USA 94304
Citazione:
F.H. Wilhelm et al., "Physiologic instability in panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder", BIOL PSYCHI, 49(7), 2001, pp. 596-605

Abstract

Background: Because panic attacks can be accompanied by surges in physiologic activation, we tested the hypothesis that panic disorder is characterized by fluctuations of physiologic variables in the absence of external triggers. Methods: Sixteen patients with panic disorder, 15 with generalized anxietydisorder, and 19 normal control subjects were asked to sit quietly for 30 min. Electrodermal, cardiovascular, and respiratory measures were analyzed using complex demodulation to quantify variability in physiologic indices. Results: Both patient groups reported equally more anxiety and cardiac symptoms than control subjects, but certain other somatic symptoms, including breathlessness, were elevated only in panic disorder patients. Mean end-tidal pCO(2), and respiratory rates were lower, and tidal volume and the number of sighs were higher in panic disorder patients than control subjects. Neither cardiovascular (heart rate, arterial pressure, cardiac output), nor electrodermal instability including sighs distinguished the groups; however,tidal volume instability was greater in panic disorder than generalized anxiety disorder patients or control subjects. Several other respiratory measures (pCO(2), respiratory rate, minute volume, duty cycle) showed greater instability in both patient groups than in control subjects. Conclusions: Respiration is particularly unstable in panic disorder, underlining the importance of respiratory physiology in understanding this disorder. Whether our findings represent state or trait characteristics is discussed. Biol Psychiatry 2001;49:596-605 (C) 2001 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

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Documento generato il 07/04/20 alle ore 03:00:49