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Titolo:
Cooperative versus non-cooperative management of shared linefish stocks inSouth Africa: an assessment of alternative management strategies for geelbek (Atractoscion aequidens)
Autore:
Hutton, T; Griffiths, MH; Sumaila, UR; Pitcher, TJ;
Indirizzi:
Univ British Columbia, Fisheries Ctr, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada Univ British Columbia Vancouver BC Canada V6T 1Z4 ver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
Titolo Testata:
FISHERIES RESEARCH
fascicolo: 1, volume: 51, anno: 2001,
pagine: 53 - 68
SICI:
0165-7836(200104)51:1<53:CVNMOS>2.0.ZU;2-F
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
BIOECONOMICS; RESOURCES;
Keywords:
bio-economic analysis; game theory; shared stocks; fisheries management policy;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
42
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Hutton, T Ctr Environm Fisheries & Aquaculture Sci, Lowestoft Lab, Pakefield Rd, Lowestoft NR33 0HT, Suffolk, England Ctr Environm Fisheries & Aquaculture Sci Pakefield Rd Lowestoft Suffolk England NR33 0HT
Citazione:
T. Hutton et al., "Cooperative versus non-cooperative management of shared linefish stocks inSouth Africa: an assessment of alternative management strategies for geelbek (Atractoscion aequidens)", FISH RES, 51(1), 2001, pp. 53-68

Abstract

The South African boat-based linefishery is a multi-species fishery with participants broadly divided into commercial (approximately 3000 vessels) and recreational (at least 4000 vessels) components. Atractoscion aequidens is an important species which, owing to a migratory lifestyle, is targeted by commercial communities throughout its estimated 2000 km distribution along the eastern seaboard of southern Africa. The national government is responsible for the management of South Africa's marine resources; in the case of the linefishery this is effort-based, with limits on minimum size, daily bags, the number of commercial permits and to some extent operational area. Results from an age-structured model reveal that the South African geelbekstock is heavily depleted, and that long term biological sustainability would require an increase in the current minimum size limit and/or a daily bag limit for commercial fishers. Compliance with regulations and thus cooperation with the responsible management authority is also essential. Cooperative versus non-cooperative management of the South African A. aequidens stock is explored using game theoretic bio-economic modelling, which simulatesthe effects of alternative size limits and effort restrictions on two separate jurisdictions that compete for this common-pool resource. The large number of players (licensees) within the linefishery creates a costly situation in terms of facilitating cooperative management, in spite of the potential greater long term social and economic benefits that such management arrangements can yield. The distribution of the different life-history stages of geelbek among competing interests on the east coast of South Africa exacerbates the problem of facilitating cooperative management, because the short term private economic benefits of non-cooperation exceeds the long term overall economic benefits from cooperative management. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

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Documento generato il 18/01/20 alle ore 13:27:26