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Titolo:
Consequences of feeding for future feeding
Autore:
Forbes, JM;
Indirizzi:
Univ Leeds, Ctr Anim Sci, Leeds Inst Biotechnol & Agr, Sch Biol, Leeds LS29JT, W Yorkshire, England Univ Leeds Leeds W Yorkshire England LS2 9JT LS29JT, W Yorkshire, England
Titolo Testata:
COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR AND INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY
fascicolo: 3, volume: 128, anno: 2001,
pagine: 463 - 470
SICI:
1095-6433(200103)128:3<463:COFFFF>2.0.ZU;2-4
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SELECTION; AVERSION; SATIETY; ANIMALS; SHEEP; FOODS;
Keywords:
discomfort; feeding; learning; metabolism; model;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
22
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Forbes, JM Univ Leeds, Ctr Anim Sci, Leeds Inst Biotechnol & Agr, Sch Biol, Leeds LS29JT, W Yorkshire, England Univ Leeds Leeds W Yorkshire England LS2 9JT orkshire, England
Citazione:
J.M. Forbes, "Consequences of feeding for future feeding", COMP BIOC A, 128(3), 2001, pp. 463-470

Abstract

The intake of food has physiological consequences via physical (e.g. distension) and chemical (e.g. glucose) stimulation of receptors in the viscera and, in the longer term, by changes in signals from adipose tissue (e.g. leptin), integrated by the CNS. These consequences are associated with the sensory properties of the food such that repeated exposure to a food generates a conditioned acceptance or rejection reflex with the physiological consequences of eating as the unconditioned stimulus (US) and the sensory characteristics of the food as the conditioned stimulus (CS). Such learnt preferences and aversions occur throughout the animal kingdom, from nematodes to human beings, with much of the research being carried out with insects, laboratory animals and farm animals. Preferences for and aversions to particular foods are manifested in non-random choices between two or more foods on offer but also influence the quantity eaten when only one food is available. These considerations have been developed into a theory of Minimal Total Discomfort which proposes that an animal experiments with the amount eaten per day, and its selection between different foods, until the total of the signals generated from excesses or deficiencies of food components is minimised. Changes in food composition and/or nutrient requirements can therefore be matched by appropriate changes in intake and selection. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 06/04/20 alle ore 08:33:12