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Titolo:
Stressful life events and survival after breast cancer
Autore:
Maunsell, E; Brisson, J; Mondor, M; Verreault, R; Deschenes, L;
Indirizzi:
Univ Laval, Epidemiol Res Grp, Quebec City, PQ, Canada Univ Laval Quebec City PQ Canada demiol Res Grp, Quebec City, PQ, Canada Univ Laval, Dept Social & Prevent Med, Quebec City, PQ, Canada Univ LavalQuebec City PQ Canada & Prevent Med, Quebec City, PQ, Canada Univ Laval, Dept Surg, Quebec City, PQ, Canada Univ Laval Quebec City PQ Canada val, Dept Surg, Quebec City, PQ, Canada
Titolo Testata:
PSYCHOSOMATIC MEDICINE
fascicolo: 2, volume: 63, anno: 2001,
pagine: 306 - 315
SICI:
0033-3174(200103/04)63:2<306:SLEASA>2.0.ZU;2-6
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS; PROGNOSTIC INDICATORS; PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS; INITIAL TREATMENT; SOCIAL SUPPORT; WOMEN; RISK; IMMUNITY; DIETARY; HEALTH;
Keywords:
breast neoplasms; stress; survival; prognosis; quality of life; survivor;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Clinical Medicine
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
38
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Maunsell, E Ctr Rech, Grp Rech Epidemiol, Pavillon St Sacrement,1050 Chemin Ste For, Quebec City, PQ G1S 4L8, Canada Ctr Rech Pavillon St Sacrement,1050 Chemin Ste For Quebec City PQ Canada G1S 4L8
Citazione:
E. Maunsell et al., "Stressful life events and survival after breast cancer", PSYCHOS MED, 63(2), 2001, pp. 306-315

Abstract

Objective: This study assessed the relation of stressful life events with survival after breast cancer. Methods: This study was based on women with histologically confirmed, newly diagnosed, localized or regional stage breast cancer first treated in 1 of 11 Quebec City (Canada) hospitals from 1982 through 1984. Among 765 eligible patients, 673 (88%) were interviewed 3 to 6 months after diagnosis about the number and perceived impact of stressfulevents in the 5 years before diagnosis. Three scores were calculated: number of events; number weighted by reported impact; and for almost 80% of events, number weighted by community-derived values reflecting adjustment required by the event. Scores were divided into quartiles to assess possible dose-response relationships. Survival was assessed in 1993, Hazard ratios and95% confidence intervals (CIs) comparing all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality were calculated with adjustment for age, presence of invaded axillary nodes, adjuvant radiotherapy, and systemic therapy tie, chemotherapy and hormone therapy). Results: When quartiles 2, 3, and 4 were compared with the appropriate lowest quartile, adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 0.99 (CI = 0.70-1.38), 0.97 (CI = 0.73-1.31), and 1.04 (CI =0.78-1.40) for number, number weighted by impact, and number weighted by community-derived values, respectively. Results were essentially similar forthe relation between stressful life events limited to those occurring within the 12 months before diagnosis and overall mortality and between stressful life events in the 5 years before diagnosis and breast cancer-specific mortality. Conclusions: Stress was conceptualized as life events presumed tobe negative, undesirable, or to require adjustment by the person confronting them. We found no evidence indicating that this kind of stress during the 5 years before diagnosis negatively affected survival among women with nonmetastatic breast cancer. Evidence from this study and others on the lack of effect of this type of stress on survival may be reassuring for women living with breast cancer.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 16/07/20 alle ore 16:22:11