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Titolo:
Changes in the cAMP-related signal transduction mechanism in postmortem human brains of heroin addicts
Autore:
Shichinohe, S; Ozawa, H; Hashimoto, E; Tatschner, T; Riederer, P; Saito, T;
Indirizzi:
Sapporo Med Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neuropsychiat, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan Sapporo Med Univ Sapporo Hokkaido Japan ychiat, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan Univ Wurzburg, Dept Psychiat, Wurzburg, Germany Univ Wurzburg Wurzburg Germany rzburg, Dept Psychiat, Wurzburg, Germany Univ Wurzburg, Dept Forens Med, Wurzburg, Germany Univ Wurzburg WurzburgGermany burg, Dept Forens Med, Wurzburg, Germany
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF NEURAL TRANSMISSION
fascicolo: 3, volume: 108, anno: 2001,
pagine: 335 - 347
SICI:
0300-9564(2001)108:3<335:CITCST>2.0.ZU;2-#
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
ADENYLYL-CYCLASE ACTIVITY; GUANINE-NUCLEOTIDE; BINDING-PROTEINS; MOLECULAR MECHANISMS; OPIATE DEPENDENCE; LOCUS-COERULEUS; DRUG-DEPENDENCE; MORPHINE; IMMUNOREACTIVITY; FORSKOLIN;
Keywords:
adenylyl cyclase; postmortem human brain; heroin; opioid; cAMP; signal transduction;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
46
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Ozawa, H Sapporo Med Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neuropsychiat, Sapporo, Hokkaido,Japan Sapporo Med Univ Sapporo Hokkaido Japan apporo, Hokkaido, Japan
Citazione:
S. Shichinohe et al., "Changes in the cAMP-related signal transduction mechanism in postmortem human brains of heroin addicts", J NEURAL TR, 108(3), 2001, pp. 335-347

Abstract

Immunoreactivities of adenylyl cyclase (AC) type I(AC-I), and basal, forskolin- and Mn2+-stimulated AC activities with or without calcium and calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) were estimated in temporal cortex (TC)-and nucleus accumbens(NAc) membranes from brains of heroin addicts and controls. Immunoreactivity of AC-I was significantly decreased in TC from brains of heroin addicts,but that did not change in NAc. Ca2+/CaM-sensitive AC activity was significantly lower in TC from brains of heroin addicts, but that activity in NAc did not show significant difference compared with the control. Some previous reports demonstrated that Ca2+/CaM-sensitive AC activity in membranes from postmortem human brain reflected the function of AC-I. Therefore, the downregulation of AC-I in TC plays an important role in the molecular mechanism of chronic opiate addiction in human brain.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 01/06/20 alle ore 01:42:20