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Titolo:
A maximum-likelihood approach to fitting equilibrium models of microsatellite evolution
Autore:
Sibly, RM; Whittaker, JC; Talbot, M;
Indirizzi:
Univ Reading, Sch Anim & Microbial Sci, Reading RG6 6AH, Berks, England Univ Reading Reading Berks England RG6 6AH eading RG6 6AH, Berks, England Univ Reading, Dept Appl Stat, Reading RG6 6AH, Berks, England Univ Reading Reading Berks England RG6 6AH eading RG6 6AH, Berks, England
Titolo Testata:
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND EVOLUTION
fascicolo: 3, volume: 18, anno: 2001,
pagine: 413 - 417
SICI:
0737-4038(200103)18:3<413:AMATFE>2.0.ZU;2-J
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SLIPPAGE EVENTS; POINT MUTATIONS; LENGTH; SIZE; CONSTRAINTS; BALANCE; YEAST;
Keywords:
microsatellite evolution; polymerase slippage; Markov chain; equilibrium models;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
17
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Sibly, RM Univ Reading, Sch Anim & Microbial Sci, POB 228, Reading RG6 6AH, Berks, England Univ Reading POB 228 Reading Berks England RG6 6AH erks, England
Citazione:
R.M. Sibly et al., "A maximum-likelihood approach to fitting equilibrium models of microsatellite evolution", MOL BIOL EV, 18(3), 2001, pp. 413-417

Abstract

Here, we develop a new approach to Markov chain modeling of microsatelliteevolution through polymerase slippage and introduce new models: a "constant-slippage-rate'' model, in which there is no dependence of slippage rate on microsatellite length, as envisaged by Moran; and a "linear-with-constant" model, in which slippage rate increases linearly with microsatellite length, but the line of best fit is not constrained to go through the origin. We show how these and a linear no-constant model can be fitted to data hierarchically using maximum likelihood. This has advantages over previous methods in allowing statistical comparisons between models. When applied to a previously analyzed data set, the method allowed us to statistically establish that slippage rate increases with microsatellite length for dinucleotide microsatellites in humans, mice, and fruit flies, and suggested that no slippage occurs in very short microsatellites of one to four repeats. The suggestion that slippage rates are zero or close to zero for very short microsatellites of one to four repeats has important implications for understanding the mechanism of polymerase slippage.

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Documento generato il 23/01/20 alle ore 12:48:10