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Titolo:
Formation and degradation of dichloroacetonitrile in drinking waters
Autore:
Reckhow, DA; Platt, TL; MacNeill, AL; McClellan, JN;
Indirizzi:
Univ Massachusetts, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Amherst, MA 01003 USA UnivMassachusetts Amherst MA USA 01003 ironm Engn, Amherst, MA 01003 USA Seattle Publ Util, Water Engn Div, Seattle, WA USA Seattle Publ Util Seattle WA USA l Util, Water Engn Div, Seattle, WA USA Tighe & Bond Consulting Engineers, Westfield, MA USA Tighe & Bond Consulting Engineers Westfield MA USA rs, Westfield, MA USA
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF WATER SERVICES RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY-AQUA
fascicolo: 1, volume: 50, anno: 2001,
pagine: 1 - 13
SICI:
0003-7214(200102)50:1<1:FADODI>2.0.ZU;2-N
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS; ALPHA-AMINO-ACIDS; ORGANIC NITROGEN; NATURAL-WATERS; CHLORINATION; DIHALOACETONITRILES; KINETICS; ALGAE;
Keywords:
chlorine; dichloroacetonitrile; disinfection by-products; hydrolysis; kinetics; precursors;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Engineering, Computing & Technology
Citazioni:
42
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Reckhow, DA Univ Massachusetts, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Amherst, MA 01003 USA Univ Massachusetts Amherst MA USA 01003 Amherst, MA 01003 USA
Citazione:
D.A. Reckhow et al., "Formation and degradation of dichloroacetonitrile in drinking waters", J WAT SER T, 50(1), 2001, pp. 1-13

Abstract

Dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) is an important example of a reactive disinfection by-product for which a large body of occurrence data exists. Although it is known to undergo base-catalysed hydrolysis, DCAN's peculiar dependence on reaction time, chlorine dose and pH has never been fully reconciled with expectations based on its presumed precursor (i.e. amino acid residues). The purpose of this research was to improve existing models for DCAN degradation and to use this information for interpretation of DCAN concentrationprofiles. Laboratory studies were performed using buffered solutions of DCAN, natural organic matter (NOM) and treated drinking waters, both with and without free residual chlorine. DCAN concentrations were measured as a function of reaction time. Results indicate a decomposition scheme encompassing three pathways of hydrolysis: attack by hydroxide, hypochlorite and water. Any one of the three pathways may predominate in drinking water systems, depending on the pH John Fl. McClellan and chlorine residual. The resulting chemical kinetic model was used to show that the DCAN formed (and subsequently decomposed) was often many times the actual measured DCAN concentration. DCAN formation was found to agree with expectations based on the underlying chemistry of chlorine attack on proteinaceous material.

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Documento generato il 29/03/20 alle ore 15:18:20