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Titolo:
The benefit of houseofficer education on proper medication dose calculation and ordering
Autore:
Nelson, LS; Gordon, PE; Simmons, MD; Goldberg, WL; Howland, MA; Hoffman, RS;
Indirizzi:
NYU, Sch Med, Bellevue Hosp Ctr, Dept Emergency Med, New York, NY USA NYUNew York NY USA levue Hosp Ctr, Dept Emergency Med, New York, NY USA New York City Poison Control Ctr, New York, NY USA New York City Poison Control Ctr New York NY USA l Ctr, New York, NY USA St Johns Univ, Coll Pharm & Allied Hlth Profess, Queens, NY USA St Johns Univ Queens NY USA Pharm & Allied Hlth Profess, Queens, NY USA
Titolo Testata:
ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE
fascicolo: 11, volume: 7, anno: 2000,
pagine: 1311 - 1316
SICI:
1069-6563(200011)7:11<1311:TBOHEO>2.0.ZU;2-4
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
ADVERSE DRUG EVENTS; PREVENTION; ERRORS;
Keywords:
medical errors; medication errors; prescriptions, drug; education, medical; internship and residency;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
10
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Nelson, LS 455 1st Ave,Room 123, New York, NY 10016 USA 455 1st Ave,Room 123 New York NY USA 10016 York, NY 10016 USA
Citazione:
L.S. Nelson et al., "The benefit of houseofficer education on proper medication dose calculation and ordering", ACAD EM MED, 7(11), 2000, pp. 1311-1316

Abstract

Objectives: Drug dosing errors commonly cause morbidity and mortality. This prospective controlled study was performed to determine: 1) residents' understanding of drug dose calculations and ordering; and 2) the short-term effect of a brief educational intervention on the skills required to properly calculate dosages and order medications. Methods: The study was conductedat an urban public hospital with a four-year emergency medicine (EM) residency program. The EM residents served as the study group and were unaware of the study design. A written, eight-question test (T1) with clinical situations and factual questions was administered. Immediately following the test, correct answers were discussed for 30 minutes. Key concepts were emphasized. Six weeks later, a repeat test (T2a) with a similar format was administered to the study group. The same test (T2b) was simultaneously administered to a control group, residents of similar training who did not take T1, in order to determine test equivalency (T1 vs T2). Tests were graded using explicit criteria by a single investigator blinded to the order of administration. Results: Twenty residents completed both tests T1 and T2a. Their mean scores were 48% and 70%, respectively (p < 0.001, paired t-test). The control group of ten residents had a mean score of 49% (T2b), similar to the study group's scores on T1 (T1 vs T2b, p = 0.40, unpaired t-test). Conclusion: Emergency medicine residents require specific training in calculating and executing drug ordering. A brief educational intervention significantly improved short-term performance when retested six weeks later. Long-term retention is unknown.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 29/11/20 alle ore 16:07:58