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Titolo:
Concussive convulsions: Emergency department assessment and management of a frequently misunderstood entity
Autore:
Perron, AD; Brady, WJ; Huff, JS;
Indirizzi:
Univ Virginia Hlth Syst, Dept Emergency Med, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USAUniv Virginia Hlth Syst Charlottesville VA USA 22908 sville, VA 22908 USA
Titolo Testata:
ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE
fascicolo: 3, volume: 8, anno: 2001,
pagine: 296 - 298
SICI:
1069-6563(200103)8:3<296:CCEDAA>2.0.ZU;2-Q
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY; POSTTRAUMATIC SEIZURES; HEAD-INJURY; POPULATION; EPILEPSY; SPORT;
Keywords:
concussion; concussive convulsion; brain injury; head injury; posttraumatic epilepsy;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
29
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Perron, AD Univ Virginia Hlth Syst, Dept Emergency Med, Box 800699, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA Univ Virginia Hlth Syst Box 800699 Charlottesville VA USA 22908
Citazione:
A.D. Perron et al., "Concussive convulsions: Emergency department assessment and management of a frequently misunderstood entity", ACAD EM MED, 8(3), 2001, pp. 296-298

Abstract

Immediate concussive convulsions are an unusual but dramatic sequela to head injuries. Previously believed to be an epileptic phenomenon, they are now thought to be a brief traumatic functional decerebration that results from loss of cortical inhibition. With concussive convulsions generally occurring within seconds of head impact and lasting up to several minutes, patients are initially in a tonic phase, followed by a clonic convulsion. A postictal phase is generally brief if it occurs at all with these episodes. Patients with isolated concussive convulsions have no evidence of structural brain injury as assessed with neuroimaging studies or physical examination. Neuropsychological testing often demonstrates transient cortical dysfunctionconsistent with the concussive episode. The long-term outcome for patientswith isolated concussive convulsion is universally good, with no long-termneurologic sequelae and no increased incidence of early or late posttraumatic epilepsy. Emergency department management should focus on evaluation ofthe associated concussive injury. The concussive convulsion requires no specific therapy, and antiepileptic medication is not indicated.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 04/04/20 alle ore 15:23:32