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Titolo:
Clinical supervision and support for nurses: an evaluation study
Autore:
Teasdale, K; Brocklehurst, N; Thom, N;
Indirizzi:
Pilgrim Hosp, Boston, Lincs, England Pilgrim Hosp Boston Lincs EnglandPilgrim Hosp, Boston, Lincs, England Univ Birmingham, Sch Hlth Sci, Birmingham, W Midlands, England Univ Birmingham Birmingham W Midlands England ngham, W Midlands, England
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING
fascicolo: 2, volume: 33, anno: 2001,
pagine: 216 - 224
SICI:
0309-2402(200101)33:2<216:CSASFN>2.0.ZU;2-6
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SWEDISH DISTRICT NURSES; IMPLEMENTATION; BURNOUT; CARE;
Keywords:
clinical; critical incident; Maslach Burnout Inventory; nursing; Nursing in Context; outcomes; supervision; survey;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
32
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Teasdale, K Albion House,15 Church St, Heckington NG34 9RF, Lincs, England Albion House,15 Church St Heckington Lincs England NG34 9RF d
Citazione:
K. Teasdale et al., "Clinical supervision and support for nurses: an evaluation study", J ADV NURS, 33(2), 2001, pp. 216-224

Abstract

Aim. To assess the effects of clinical supervision and informal support onqualified nurses. Rationale. Earlier small-scale research studies have provided conflicting evidence about the impact of clinical supervision, hence the need for this larger-scale study. Design. Survey design drawing on an opportunity sample of 211 qualified nurses from 11 randomly selected hospital and community NHS Trusts in one region in England. Quantitative data collection used the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the Nursing in Context Questionnaire (NICQ), while qualitative data were based on written critical incidents. The analysis compared supervized with unsupervized nurses. Findings. The critical incident analysis revealed that supervized nurses continued to use informal support networks as well as their supervision sessions to discuss clinical issues. The MBI found no significant differences in levels of burnout between supervized and unsupervized nurses. However, the NCIQ detected some statistically significant differences, with supervizednurses reporting a more listening and supportive management, coping betterat work and feeling that they had better access to support than unsupervized nurses. Closer analysis found that this positive finding was particularly strong among the more junior supervized nurses. Conclusion. Where resources are limited, it is better to concentrate on providing clinical supervision to more junior grades of nurses as a valued form of support during their early years as qualified practitioners.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 07/07/20 alle ore 05:48:21