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Titolo:
Phytate and phytase: consequences for protein utilisation
Autore:
Selle, PH; Ravindran, V; Caldwell, RA; Bryden, WL;
Indirizzi:
Univ Sydney, Dept Anim Sci, Camden, NSW 2570, Australia Univ Sydney Camden NSW Australia 2570 im Sci, Camden, NSW 2570, Australia BASF Anim Nutr, Auburn, NSW 2144, Australia BASF Anim Nutr Auburn NSW Australia 2144 utr, Auburn, NSW 2144, Australia Massey Univ, Inst Food Nutr & Human Hlth, Monogastr Res Ctr, Palmerston North, New Zealand Massey Univ Palmerston North New Zealand Palmerston North, New Zealand Univ Sydney, Dept Agr Chem & Soil Sci, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia Univ Sydney Sydney NSW Australia 2006 il Sci, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
Titolo Testata:
NUTRITION RESEARCH REVIEWS
fascicolo: 2, volume: 13, anno: 2000,
pagine: 255 - 278
SICI:
0954-4224(200012)13:2<255:PAPCFP>2.0.ZU;2-B
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
AMINO-ACID DIGESTIBILITY; APPARENT METABOLIZABLE ENERGY; ASPERGILLUS-NIGER PHYTASE; DIETARY PHYTIC ACID; SOYBEAN MEAL DIETS; MICROBIAL PHYTASE; BROILER-CHICKENS; PHOSPHORUS AVAILABILITY; MINERAL BIOAVAILABILITY; ILEAL DIGESTIBILITY;
Keywords:
amino-acid digestibility; phytase; phytate;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
136
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Selle, PH Univ Sydney, Dept Anim Sci, Camden, NSW 2570, Australia Univ Sydney Camden NSW Australia 2570 mden, NSW 2570, Australia
Citazione:
P.H. Selle et al., "Phytate and phytase: consequences for protein utilisation", NUTR RES R, 13(2), 2000, pp. 255-278

Abstract

The excretion of large amounts of P in effluent from intensive pig and poultry units is indicative of the poor availability of phytate-bound P in plant-derived feed ingredients. This environmental problem prompted the development and acceptance of microbial phytase feed enzymes for single-stomachedanimals. Their introduction led to an increasing recognition that phytate may have adverse effects on protein utilisation in addition to P. Consequently, the nutritional relevance of protein-phytate interactions for pigs andpoultry is considered in the present review. Since the current understanding of the effects of protein-phytate interactions comes mainly from responses obtained to added phytase, literature on the influence of microbial phytases on amino acid digestibility and utilisation is summarised, followed bya discussion of possible mechanisms contributing to the negative effects of phytate. However, the rationale for the protein responses to added phytase remains largely speculative, and several modes of action are probably involved. It may be that the release of protein from protein-phytate complexesoccurring naturally in feed ingredients, the prevention of formation of binary and ternary protein-phytate complexes within the gut, the alleviation of the negative impact of phytate on digestive enzymes and the reduction inendogenous amino acid losses are all contributing factors. A better understanding of the mechanisms of protein-phytate interactions and the modes of action of exogenous phytase enzymes is clearly desirable. Studies are also needed to identify and quantify the factors that contribute to the variableamino acid responses to added phytase. It appears that the relative solubilities of phytate salts and proteins from different feed ingredients and their effects on the extent of protein-phytate complex formation, coupled with variations in the effectiveness of phytase in different dietary contexts,may be the major factors responsible.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 30/11/20 alle ore 05:51:10