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Titolo:
Factors associated with self-disclosure of HIV serostatus to significant others
Autore:
Petrak, JA; Doyle, AM; Smith, A; Skinner, C; Hedge, B;
Indirizzi:
Royal London Hosp, Ambrose King Ctr, London E1 1BB, England Royal London Hosp London England E1 1BB King Ctr, London E1 1BB, England St Bartholomews Hosp, London, England St Bartholomews Hosp London England Bartholomews Hosp, London, England
Titolo Testata:
BRITISH JOURNAL OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
, volume: 6, anno: 2001,
parte:, 1
pagine: 69 - 79
SICI:
1359-107X(200102)6:<69:FAWSOH>2.0.ZU;2-K
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SOCIAL SUPPORT; INFECTION; FAMILY; MEN;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
23
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Petrak, JA Royal London Hosp, Ambrose King Ctr, London E1 1BB, England Royal London Hosp London England E1 1BB ondon E1 1BB, England
Citazione:
J.A. Petrak et al., "Factors associated with self-disclosure of HIV serostatus to significant others", BR J H PSYC, 6, 2001, pp. 69-79

Abstract

Objectives. To examine rates and patterns of self-disclosure of HIV serostatus amongst individuals attending an out-patient HIV clinic in East London. Design. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Methods. A volunteer sample of 95 out-patient HIV clinic attendees completed a self-report questionnaire examining patterns of disclosure to self-identified significant others, reasons for disclosure and non-disclosure, satisfaction with social support (SSQ6), quality of life (MOS-30) and anxiety and depression (HADS). Self-disclosure was examined in relation to cultural background, gender, satisfaction with social support, and medical and psychological variables. Results. Seventy-nine men and 16 women reported a mean disclosure rate of 68% to self-identified significant others. Five individuals had not disclosed their HIV status to anyone; 91% of individuals had informed their partner. Friends were more frequently informed (79%) than family (53%). Ethnicity(p < .001) and length of time since testing HIV seropositive (p < .05) emerged as significant predictors of disclosure. Global satisfaction with social support was negatively correlated with depression bur was not associatedwith the total rate of HIV disclosure. Frequently reported reasons for non-disclosure included wanting to protect others from distress and fear of discrimination. Conclusions. Self-disclosure of:HIV serostatus rates was highest for partners, followed by friends, and lowest for: family members. Patterns of disclosure of HIV serostatus varied in relation to ethnicity. Fifteen years intothe HIV epidemic, social stigma continues to contribute towards non-disclosure of diagnosis.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 20/09/20 alle ore 01:08:54