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Titolo:
The relative contributions of ecstasy and cannabis to cognitive impairment
Autore:
Croft, RJ; Mackay, AJ; Mills, ATD; Gruzelier, JGH;
Indirizzi:
Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Sch Med, Dept Cognit Neurosci& Behav, London W6 8RF, England Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med London England W6 8RF ngland
Titolo Testata:
PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY
fascicolo: 3, volume: 153, anno: 2001,
pagine: 373 - 379
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
3,4-METHYLENEDIOXYMETHAMPHETAMINE MDMA; RAT-BRAIN; (+/-)3,4-METHYLENEDIOXYMETHAMPHETAMINE MDMA; MEMORY IMPAIRMENT; RECREATIONAL USE; SHORT-TERM; SEROTONIN; DOPAMINE; DEFICITS; NEUROTOXICITY;
Keywords:
cognitive impairment; cannabis; Delta 9-THC; ecstasy; MDMA;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
46
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Croft, RJ Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Sch Med, Dept Cognit Neurosci& Behav, St Dunstans Rd, London W6 8RF, England Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med St Dunstans Rd London England W6 8RF
Citazione:
R.J. Croft et al., "The relative contributions of ecstasy and cannabis to cognitive impairment", PSYCHOPHAR, 153(3), 2001, pp. 373-379

Abstract

Rationale: (+/-)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; 'ecstasy'), a commonly used recreational drug, has typically been found to be related to poor cognitive function in humans. However, cannabis consumption may not havebeen adequately controlled for in these studies. Objective: The present study was designed to further elucidate the relation between MDMA and cannabis in cognitive impairment. Methods: Subjects who had used neither MDMA nor cannabis (controls; n=31), cannabis but not MDMA (cannabis users; n=18) andboth MDMA and cannabis (MDMA/cannabis users; n=11) were compared on a battery of neuropsychological tests. Results: The cannabis and MDMA/cannabis groups did not differ on any of the tests, whereas the combined cannabis and MDMA/cannabis groups performed more poorly than controls on tests of memory, learning, word fluency, speed of processing and manual dexterity. Further, apart from speed of processing where higher MDMA consumption predicted slower processing, covariate analysis revealed that the deficits were more closely related to cannabis than MDMA usage. Conclusion: The results suggest that cannabis is an important confound in studies of MDMA-related cognitiveimpairment, and that previously reported cognitive impairment in MDMA users may have been caused by coincident cannabis use.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 19/01/20 alle ore 20:26:56