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Titolo:
How study of respiratory physiology aided our understanding of abnormal brain function in panic disorder
Autore:
Sinha, S; Papp, LA; Gorman, JM;
Indirizzi:
Columbia Univ, Dept Psychiat, New York, NY 10032 USA Columbia Univ New York NY USA 10032 Dept Psychiat, New York, NY 10032 USA New York State Psychiat Inst, Dept Clin Psychobiol, New York, NY USA New York State Psychiat Inst New York NY USA sychobiol, New York, NY USA
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS
fascicolo: 3, volume: 61, anno: 2000,
pagine: 191 - 200
SICI:
0165-0327(200012)61:3<191:HSORPA>2.0.ZU;2-0
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
CEREBRAL BLOOD-FLOW; CARBON-DIOXIDE; LACTATE INFUSION; ANXIETY; HYPERVENTILATION; ATTACKS; THERAPY; ALPRAZOLAM; HYPOTHESIS; AMYGDALA;
Keywords:
fear and neuroimaging; hyperventilation; panic attacks;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
48
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Gorman, JM 1051 Riverside Dr, New York, NY 10032 USA 1051 Riverside Dr New York NY USA 10032 New York, NY 10032 USA
Citazione:
S. Sinha et al., "How study of respiratory physiology aided our understanding of abnormal brain function in panic disorder", J AFFECT D, 61(3), 2000, pp. 191-200

Abstract

There is a substantial body of literature demonstrating that stimulation of respiration (hyperventilation) is a common event in panic disorder patients during panic attack episodes. Further, a number of abnormalities in respiration, such as enhanced CO2 sensitivity, have been detected in panic patients. This led some to posit that there is a fundamental abnormality in thephysiological mechanisms that control breathing in panic disorder and thatthis abnormality is central to illness etiology. More recently, however, evidence has accumulated suggesting that respiratory physiology is normal inpanic patients and that their tendency to hyperventilate and to react withpanic to respiratory stimulants like CO2 represents the triggering of a hypersensitive fear network. The fear network anatomy is taken from preclinical studies that have identified the brain pathways that subserve the acquisition and maintenance of conditioned fear. Included are the amygdala and its brain stem projections, the hippocampus, and the medial prefrontal cortex. Although attempts to image this system in patients during panic attacks have been difficult, the theory that the fear network is operative and hyperactive in panic patients explains why both medication and psychosocial therapies are clearly effective. Studies of respiration in panic disorder are an excellent example of the way in which peripheral markers have guided researchers in developing a more complete picture of the neural events that occur in psychopathological states. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 06/04/20 alle ore 20:26:48