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Titolo:
Microsatellite determination of male reproductive success in a natural population of the territorial ornate dragon lizard, Ctenophorus ornatus
Autore:
Lebas, NR;
Indirizzi:
Univ Western Australia, Dept Zool, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia Univ Western Australia Nedlands WA Australia 6009 nds, WA 6009, Australia
Titolo Testata:
MOLECULAR ECOLOGY
fascicolo: 1, volume: 10, anno: 2001,
pagine: 193 - 203
SICI:
0962-1083(200101)10:1<193:MDOMRS>2.0.ZU;2-O
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
MALE MATING SUCCESS; TUFTED MALACHITE SUNBIRD; EXTRA-PAIR PATERNITY; FEMALE MATE CHOICE; SEXUAL SELECTION; TILIQUA-RUGOSA; DOMINANT MALES; LACERTA-AGILIS; MALE ADORNMENT; SAND LIZARDS;
Keywords:
lizard; mating success; microsatellites; parentage assignment; reproductive success; sexual selection; territories;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
46
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Lebas, NR Univ St Andrews, Dept Biol & Preclin Med, St Andrews KY16 9TS, Fife, Scotland Univ St Andrews St Andrews Fife Scotland KY16 9TS ife, Scotland
Citazione:
N.R. Lebas, "Microsatellite determination of male reproductive success in a natural population of the territorial ornate dragon lizard, Ctenophorus ornatus", MOL ECOL, 10(1), 2001, pp. 193-203

Abstract

It is now evident that the genetic mating system can be very different to the observed mating system. However, it is less well known what makes particular individuals more (or less) successful than expected from the observedsystem. In this study the observed territorial structure of a field population of the agamid lizard, Ctenophorus ornatus, was compared with the mating system as evidenced by microsatellite parentage assignment. This study also investigated whether any male traits predicted reproductive success. Sixty-five per cent of clutches were sired at least partially by a male other than the main territory-holding male and 35% of clutches were sired by a male with no overlap of the female's territory. Multiple paternity was moderately frequent at 25% of clutches. Male chest patch size predicted territorysize and the number of females in the territory, but did not predict reproductive success. Instead, male head depth and body size were independently related to the number of offspring sired. As male head depth also predictedthe number of females in a territory, these males are likely to be gainingincreased reproductive success as a consequence of the higher number of females in their territories. Larger body size males, however, did not have agreater number of females in their territory and instead had more extra-territorial copulations. Whether these extra-territorial copulations are due to female choice or success in male competition is unknown.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 10/07/20 alle ore 15:29:37