Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Views of young people using augmentative and alternative communication systems
Autore:
Clarke, M; McConachie, H; Price, K; Wood, P;
Indirizzi:
Wolfson Ctr, Inst Child Hlth, London WC1N 2AP, England Wolfson Ctr London England WC1N 2AP Child Hlth, London WC1N 2AP, England Fleming Nuffield Unit, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England Fleming Nuffield Unit Newcastle Upon Tyne Tyne & Wear England r, England Great Ormond St Hosp Children NHS Trust, Neurodisabil Serv, London WC1N 3JH, England Great Ormond St Hosp Children NHS Trust London England WC1N 3JH England
Titolo Testata:
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF LANGUAGE & COMMUNICATION DISORDERS
fascicolo: 1, volume: 36, anno: 2001,
pagine: 107 - 115
SICI:
1368-2822(200101/03)36:1<107:VOYPUA>2.0.ZU;2-M
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
CHILDREN;
Keywords:
attitudes; augmentative and alternative communication (AAC); children; speech and language therapy;
Tipo documento:
Editorial Material
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
26
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Clarke, M Wolfson Ctr, Inst Child Hlth, Mecklenburgh Sq, London WC1N 2AP, England Wolfson Ctr Mecklenburgh Sq London England WC1N 2AP AP, England
Citazione:
M. Clarke et al., "Views of young people using augmentative and alternative communication systems", INT J LAN C, 36(1), 2001, pp. 107-115

Abstract

Children with physical impairments who cannot use intelligible speech are often recommended augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. In England and Wales, it is usually the job of speech and language therapists to support development in AAC skills. This paper reports findings from discussion with children and young people who use AAC systems concerning their attitudes and opinions towards the organization of speech and language therapy, the role of the speech and language therapist in school and issuesconcerned with AAC systems themselves. Six young adults and 17 children from London education authorities were interviewed on a one-to-one basis and in focus groups. Children were interviewed who had a communication aid incorporating at least 20 symbols and/or pictures and/or written words, language understanding at the two-word level and above, i.e. they demonstrated understanding of adult requests with at least two information carrying words. For children using communication aids, it is conceivable that their communication systems do not contain appropriate symbol vocabulary to express complex ideas, opinions and feelings. Consequently, a symbol-based interview tool was designed to allow children to express complex issues through visual means. Most children interviewed reported that their AAC system was useful to them. Further analysis of opinions revealed that negative attitudes towards AAC systems were primarily associated with operational issues (technical skills required to operate an AAC system) and issues of self-image/identity, and to some degree, with a lack of perceived benefit in interaction. Inapparent contrast to therapists' preferred models of working, children andyoung people identified a preference for therapy organized on a one-to-onebasis targeting Linguistic and operational skills. It is suggested that more acceptable and individualized design of AAC systems could have implications for their use in school and other contexts. The value of service users'views in service planning and evaluation are discussed.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 22/01/20 alle ore 22:20:28