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Titolo:
Variation in fecundity among populations of snails is predicted by prevalence of castrating parasites
Autore:
Krist, AC;
Indirizzi:
Indiana Univ, Dept Biol, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA Indiana Univ Bloomington IN USA 47405 ept Biol, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA
Titolo Testata:
EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY RESEARCH
fascicolo: 2, volume: 3, anno: 2001,
pagine: 191 - 197
SICI:
1522-0613(200102)3:2<191:VIFAPO>2.0.ZU;2-C
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
BIOMPHALARIA-GLABRATA; REPRODUCTIVE EFFORT; HOST; ECOLOGY; COST;
Keywords:
castrating parasites; fecundity compensation; life-history theory; reproduction; snails; trematodes;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
20
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Krist, AC Univ Wisconsin, Dept Biol, Phillips Hall 330, Eau Claire, WI 54701 USA Univ Wisconsin Phillips Hall 330 Eau Claire WI USA 54701 701 USA
Citazione:
A.C. Krist, "Variation in fecundity among populations of snails is predicted by prevalence of castrating parasites", EVOL EC RES, 3(2), 2001, pp. 191-197

Abstract

Life-history theory predicts that high mortality should cause selection for high reproductive effort. Because parasitic castration has an equivalent role to mortality, from a fitness perspective, populations with high prevalence of castrating parasites are predicted to exhibit high reproductive effort relative to populations with low prevalence. I examined this predictionby studying populations of the freshwater snail. Elimia livescens, that vary in prevalence of castrating trematodes. Specifically, I determined whether there was a positive relationship between reproductive output and prevalence of castrating trematodes among populations. Consistent with predictions, females from populations with a high prevalence of castrating trematodesproduced more eggs than females from populations with a low prevalence. Either genetic canalization or phenotypic plasticity may have caused the relationship between reproductive output and parasitism. By either mechanism, the results suggest that castrating parasites shape the life histories of their hosts.

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Documento generato il 01/04/20 alle ore 11:49:37