Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Anti-predator behavior of Vancouver island marmots: Using congeners to evaluate abilities of a critically endangered mammal
Autore:
Blumstein, DT; Daniel, JC; Bryant, AA;
Indirizzi:
Univ Kansas, Dept Systemat & Ecol, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA Univ Kansas Lawrence KS USA 66045 Systemat & Ecol, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA Macquarie Univ, Dept Biol, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia Macquarie Univ Sydney NSW Australia 2109 iol, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia Macquarie Univ, Dept Psychol, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia Macquarie Univ Sydney NSW Australia 2109 hol, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia Vancouver Isl Marmot Recovery Project, Nanaimo, BC, Canada Vancouver Isl Marmot Recovery Project Nanaimo BC Canada aimo, BC, Canada
Titolo Testata:
ETHOLOGY
fascicolo: 1, volume: 107, anno: 2001,
pagine: 1 - 14
SICI:
0179-1613(200101)107:1<1:ABOVIM>2.0.ZU;2-4
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
POPULATION-DYNAMICS; SOCIAL-ORGANIZATION; GOLDEN MARMOTS; MONAX; VIGILANCE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
52
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Blumstein, DT Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Organ Biol Ecol & Evolut, 621 Charles E YoungDr S, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA Univ Calif Los Angeles 621 Charles E Young Dr S Los Angeles CA USA 90095
Citazione:
D.T. Blumstein et al., "Anti-predator behavior of Vancouver island marmots: Using congeners to evaluate abilities of a critically endangered mammal", ETHOLOGY, 107(1), 2001, pp. 1-14

Abstract

Behavioral comparisons between endangered species and their congeners may provide valuable data with which to test ideas about declining populations or the future direction of recovery efforts. We considered the case of the highly endangered Vancouver Island marmot (Marmota vancouverensis). Predation is a current source of mortality, and inadequate anti-predator behavior could have profound ramifications for the future success of re-introductions. We tested whether M, vancouverensis anti-predator behavior was unusual or 'deficient' by quantifying it and comparing it to 13 other marmot species. We found no evidence that Vancouver Island marmots were unwary. If anything, the converse was true. Vancouver Island marmots were responsive and vigilant towards real and simulated predatory threats. They dug numerous escape burrows that reduced the likelihood of predation. Our results have several implications for future recovery efforts, one of which was to establish 'baseline' flight-response targets that captive-bred Vancouver Island marmots will have to meet or exceed prior to release into predator-rich environments.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 07/04/20 alle ore 21:52:03