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Titolo:
Substance use during pregnancy in the state of California, USA
Autore:
Finch, BK; Vega, WA; Kolody, B;
Indirizzi:
Univ Texas, Dept Sociol, Populat Res Ctr, Austin, TX 78712 USA Univ TexasAustin TX USA 78712 iol, Populat Res Ctr, Austin, TX 78712 USA Univ Med & Dent New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Med Sch, Newark, NJ 07103 USA Univ Med & Dent New Jersey Newark NJ USA 07103 Sch, Newark, NJ 07103 USA San Diego State Univ, Dept Sociol, San Diego, CA 92182 USA San Diego StateUniv San Diego CA USA 92182 ciol, San Diego, CA 92182 USA
Titolo Testata:
SOCIAL SCIENCE & MEDICINE
fascicolo: 4, volume: 52, anno: 2001,
pagine: 571 - 583
SICI:
0277-9536(200102)52:4<571:SUDPIT>2.0.ZU;2-L
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTERISTICS; DRUG-ABUSE; ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT; MULTILEVEL ANALYSIS; RACE DIFFERENCES; MARIJUANA USE; COCAINE USE; WOMEN; HEALTH; POPULATION;
Keywords:
community effects; perinatal substance use; race;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
81
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Finch, BK Univ Texas, Dept Sociol, Populat Res Ctr, 1800 Main Bldg, Austin, TX 78712USA Univ Texas 1800 Main Bldg Austin TX USA 78712 ustin, TX 78712USA
Citazione:
B.K. Finch et al., "Substance use during pregnancy in the state of California, USA", SOCIAL SC M, 52(4), 2001, pp. 571-583

Abstract

Most analyses of prenatal substance use focus on individual level correlates and ignore community level variables and the effect of the dependency ofrespondents within communities. This analysis uses multilevel logistic regression models to more accurately assess the correlates of perinatal substance use in California. Statistical results indicate that a significant portion of substance use can be attributed to neighborhood heterogeneity, and that traditional models of substance use may inaccurately attribute this variation to individual level regression coefficients. Substantive results indicate that levels of neighborhood public assistance had an independent, significant effect on the prevalence of all substances tested for except alcohol. Black women had higher predicted prevalence risks for alcohol and cocaine while White women had higher predicted risks for tobacco, marijuana and amphetamines. Racial contrasts were nonsignificant for the overall illicit drug category and opiates, after controlling for neighborhood public assistance. Finally, individual level variables, with the exception of age, were not moderated by levels of neighborhood public assistance. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Documento generato il 14/07/20 alle ore 05:31:02