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Titolo:
Pandemic threat posed by avian influenza A viruses
Autore:
Horimoto, T; Kawaoka, Y;
Indirizzi:
Univ Wisconsin, Sch Vet Med, Dept Pathobiol Sci, Madison, WI 53706 USA Univ Wisconsin Madison WI USA 53706 Pathobiol Sci, Madison, WI 53706 USA Univ Tokyo, Inst Med Sci, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1088639, Japan Univ Tokyo Tokyo Japan 1088639 Med Sci, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1088639, Japan Univ Osaka Prefecture, Dept Vet Microbiol, Osaka 5998531, Japan Univ OsakaPrefecture Osaka Japan 5998531 icrobiol, Osaka 5998531, Japan
Titolo Testata:
CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY REVIEWS
fascicolo: 1, volume: 14, anno: 2001,
pagine: 129 -
SICI:
0893-8512(200101)14:1<129:PTPBAI>2.0.ZU;2-J
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
HEMAGGLUTININ CLEAVAGE SITE; A H5N1 VIRUS; RECEPTOR-BINDING SITE; SINGLE-AMINO-ACID; UNUSUAL SUBTYPE H1N7; ION-CHANNEL ACTIVITY; HONG-KONG; NS2 PROTEIN; MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION; GENETIC-CHARACTERIZATION;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
221
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Kawaoka, Y Univ Wisconsin, Sch Vet Med, Dept Pathobiol Sci, 2015 Linden DrW, Madison, WI 53706 USA Univ Wisconsin 2015 Linden Dr W Madison WI USA 53706 53706 USA
Citazione:
T. Horimoto e Y. Kawaoka, "Pandemic threat posed by avian influenza A viruses", CLIN MICROB, 14(1), 2001, pp. 129

Abstract

Influenza pandemics, defined as global outbreaks of the disease due to viruses with new antigenic subtypes, have exacted high death tolls from human populations. The last two pandemics were caused by hybrid viruses, or reassortants, that harbored a combination of avian and human viral genes. Avian influenza viruses are therefore key contributors to the emergence of human influenza pandemics. In 1997 an H5N1 influenza virus was directly transmitted from birds in live poultry markets in Hong Kong to humans. Eighteen people were infected in this outbreak, six of whom died. This avian virus exhibited high virulence in both avian and mammalian species, causing systemic infection in both chickens and mice. Subsequently, another avian virus with the H9N2 subtype was directly transmitted from birds to humans in Hong Kong. Interestingly, the genes encoding the internal proteins of the H9N2 virusare genetically highly related to those of the H5N1 virus, suggesting a unique property of these gene products. The identification of avian viruses in humans underscores the potential of these and similar strains to produce devastating influenza outbreaks in major population centers. Although highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses had been identified before the 1997 outbreak in Hong Kong, their devastating effects had been confined to poultry. With the Hong Kong outbreak, it became clear that the virulence potentialof these viruses extended to humans.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 23/01/20 alle ore 12:51:41