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Titolo:
Preventable smoking and exercise-related hospital admissions - A model based on the NHEFS
Autore:
Russell, LB; Teutsch, SM; Kumar, R; Dey, A; Milan, E;
Indirizzi:
Rutgers State Univ, Inst Hlth Hlth Care Policy & Aging Res, New Brunswick,NJ 08901 USA Rutgers State Univ New Brunswick NJ USA 08901 New Brunswick,NJ 08901 USA Rutgers State Univ, Dept Econ, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 USA Rutgers State Univ New Brunswick NJ USA 08901 New Brunswick, NJ 08901 USA Merck & Co Inc, Outcomes Res & Management, W Point, PA USA Merck & Co IncW Point PA USA Outcomes Res & Management, W Point, PA USA
Titolo Testata:
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
fascicolo: 1, volume: 20, anno: 2001,
pagine: 26 - 34
SICI:
0749-3797(200101)20:1<26:PSAEHA>2.0.ZU;2-7
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE; ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY; LIFE EXPECTANCY; UNITED-STATES; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY; POLICY MODEL; OLDER ADULTS; RISK-FACTORS; HEALTH-CARE; IMPACT;
Keywords:
exercise; health behavior; hospitalization; preventive medicine; primary prevention; risk; statistical models;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
40
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Russell, LB Rutgers State Univ, Inst Hlth, 30 Coll Ave, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 USA Rutgers State Univ 30 Coll Ave New Brunswick NJ USA 08901 USA
Citazione:
L.B. Russell et al., "Preventable smoking and exercise-related hospital admissions - A model based on the NHEFS", AM J PREV M, 20(1), 2001, pp. 26-34

Abstract

Background: The NHANES I Epidemiologic Follow-Up Study (NHEFS), a longitudinal study of a representative sample of U.S. adults, makes it possible forthe first time to develop a simulation model relating hospital admissions to baseline clinical risk factors for the general adult population. The model is presented here and used to project the impact on hospital admissions of changes in smoking behavior-and sedentary lifestyle. Methods: Three kinds of projections were calculated for the cohort of adults aged 45 to 74 at baseline: projections of hospital admissions in the absence Of the risk factor; projections that reflect a 10-year lag between behavior change and full health benefit; and projections that reflect both lagand incomplete adherence to: behavior change. For incomplete adherence we assumed that only 10% of the at-risk population changed their behavior. Results: Tests of the simulation model showed that it agreed with a Cox analysis of the hospital data and accurately projected observed hospital admissions over the study period. The projections showed that eliminating smoking would reduce annual rates of all-cause hospitalization among older adults by 8.9% 20 years after baseline. Eliminating inactivity would reduce them4.6%. Introducing a lag of 10 years between behavior modification and fullbenefit delayed the impact on hospitalization rates but the effect at 20 years was the same. When only 10% of the population at risk stopped smoking or became physically active, a percentage that reflects the effectiveness of current interventions, annual hospitalization rates at 20 years fell by 0.9% and 0.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Substantial reductions in hospital admissions can be achievedby interventions to prevent smoking, help smokers quit, or encourage inactive persons to become active. Improving adherence can markedly improve the impact on hospitalizations. The costs of these efforts would be rewarded not only by better health, but by lower expenditures for hospitalization. (C)2001 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 04/04/20 alle ore 08:08:46