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Titolo:
What controls who is where in freshwater fish communities - the roles of biotic, abiotic, and spatial factors
Autore:
Jackson, DA; Peres-Neto, PR; Olden, JD;
Indirizzi:
Univ Toronto, Dept Zool, Toronto, ON M5S 3G5, Canada Univ Toronto TorontoON Canada M5S 3G5 Zool, Toronto, ON M5S 3G5, Canada
Titolo Testata:
CANADIAN JOURNAL OF FISHERIES AND AQUATIC SCIENCES
fascicolo: 1, volume: 58, anno: 2001,
pagine: 157 - 170
SICI:
0706-652X(200101)58:1<157:WCWIWI>2.0.ZU;2-2
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
STREAM-FISH; SPECIES RICHNESS; ENVIRONMENTAL GRADIENTS; NORTHERN WISCONSIN; SMALLMOUTH BASS; ONTARIO LAKES; ASSEMBLAGES; ECOLOGY; PATTERNS; RIVER;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
98
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Jackson, DA Univ Toronto, Dept Zool, Toronto, ON M5S 3G5, Canada Univ Toronto Toronto ON Canada M5S 3G5 to, ON M5S 3G5, Canada
Citazione:
D.A. Jackson et al., "What controls who is where in freshwater fish communities - the roles of biotic, abiotic, and spatial factors", CAN J FISH, 58(1), 2001, pp. 157-170

Abstract

We examine evidence for the structuring of fish communities from stream and lake systems and the roles of biotic, abiotic, and spatial factors in determining the species composition. Piscivory by fish is a dominant factor inboth stream and lake systems whereas evidence for the importance of competition appears less convincing. Within small streams or lakes, the impact ofpredation may exclude other species, thereby leading to mutually exclusivedistributions and strong differences in community composition. Within a geographic region, abiotic effects frequently dictate the relative importanceof piscivory, thereby indirectly influencing the composition of prey species present. The spatial scale of studies influences our perceived importance of biotic versus abiotic factors, with small-scale studies indicating a greater importance of competition and large-scale studies emphasizing abiotic controls. The scale of the individual sites considered is critical because smaller systems have higher variability and wider extremes of conditions than larger lakes and rivers. The stability of physical systems and degree of spatial connectivity contribute to increased diversity in both larger stream and larger lake systems. We identify challenges and needs that must beaddressed both to advance the field of fish community ecology and to face the problems associated with human-induced changes.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 11/07/20 alle ore 04:30:20