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Titolo:
Optimal swimming speeds and forward-assisted propulsion: energy-conservingbehaviours of upriver-migrating adult salmon
Autore:
Hinch, SG; Rand, PS;
Indirizzi:
Univ British Columbia, Dept Forest Sci, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada UnivBritish Columbia Vancouver BC Canada V6T 1Z4 ver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada Univ British Columbia, Inst Resources & Environm, Westwater Res Unit, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada Univ British Columbia Vancouver BC Canada V6T 1Z4 ver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada N Carolina State Univ, Dept Zool, Clark Labs 1, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA N Carolina State Univ Raleigh NC USA 27695 Labs 1, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA
Titolo Testata:
CANADIAN JOURNAL OF FISHERIES AND AQUATIC SCIENCES
fascicolo: 12, volume: 57, anno: 2000,
pagine: 2470 - 2478
SICI:
0706-652X(200012)57:12<2470:OSSAFP>2.0.ZU;2-7
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SOCKEYE-SALMON; ONCORHYNCHUS-NERKA; FISH; BIOENERGETICS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
23
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Hinch, SG Univ British Columbia, Dept Forest Sci, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada Univ British Columbia 2424 Main Mall Vancouver BC Canada V6T 1Z4
Citazione:
S.G. Hinch e P.S. Rand, "Optimal swimming speeds and forward-assisted propulsion: energy-conservingbehaviours of upriver-migrating adult salmon", CAN J FISH, 57(12), 2000, pp. 2470-2478

Abstract

Anadromous salmon migrations are energetically expensive. Long-distance migrants should be efficient in their use of energy and minimize swimming costs wherever possible. We explore swimming strategies and energy-saving tactics employed by three long-distance-migrating sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) stocks in the Fraser River watershed, British Columbia. We used stereovideography and bank-side observations to estimate swimming speeds (from tailbeat frequency) and ground speeds (using distance traveled and duration) for individuals at several sites. Salmon were highly efficient at migration (i.e., ground speeds equaled or exceeded swimming speeds) through reaches with relatively low encountered currents (<0.25 m.s(-1)). We speculate that salmon exploit small reverse-flow vortices to achieve this feat. With low encountered currents, most salmon migrated according to an optimal swimming speed model: migrants minimized transport costs per unit distance traveled. Generally, salmon were less efficient at migration with fast currents, although the Chilko stock were superoptimal migrants, possibly owing to unique morphology and (or) behaviours. The risk of significant delays is enhanced when fast currents are encountered. Under these conditions, relatively fast swimming speeds could minimize travel time, despite high costs. Migrants may be balancing energetic costs of migration against the fitness costs of spawning delays.

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Documento generato il 04/04/20 alle ore 12:11:02