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Titolo:
Etching, smoothing, and deposition with gas-cluster ion beam technology
Autore:
Greer, JA; Fenner, DB; Hautala, J; Allen, LP; DiFilippo, V; Toyoda, N; Yamada, I; Matsuo, J; Minami, E; Katsumata, H;
Indirizzi:
Ep Corp, Billerica, MA 01821 USA Ep Corp Billerica MA USA 01821Ep Corp, Billerica, MA 01821 USA Tufts Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Boston, MA 02111 USA Tufts Univ Boston MA USA02111 Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Boston, MA 02111 USA MIT, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Boston, MA USA MIT Boston MA USAMIT, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Boston, MA USA Kyoto Univ, Ion Beam Engn Expt Lab, Kyoto, Japan Kyoto Univ Kyoto JapanKyoto Univ, Ion Beam Engn Expt Lab, Kyoto, Japan
Titolo Testata:
SURFACE & COATINGS TECHNOLOGY
, volume: 133, anno: 2000,
pagine: 273 - 282
SICI:
0257-8972(200011)133:<273:ESADWG>2.0.ZU;2-Y
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Keywords:
gas cluster ion beam; ion beam assisted deposition; surface smoothing; gas clusters;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Engineering, Computing & Technology
Citazioni:
13
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Greer, JA Ep Corp, Billerica, MA 01821 USA Ep Corp Billerica MA USA 01821Ep Corp, Billerica, MA 01821 USA
Citazione:
J.A. Greer et al., "Etching, smoothing, and deposition with gas-cluster ion beam technology", SURF COAT, 133, 2000, pp. 273-282

Abstract

Gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) processing has recently been introduced as a commercial tool for processing 'rough' surfaces, such as polished substratesor thin films. The physical interaction of a gas cluster ion beam with a surface is strikingly different from that of better-known 'monomer' ion beams. Clusters are formed by the adiabatic expansion of gas through a nozzle, ionization by electron impact, acceleration, and then impingement upon the surface to be processed. The physics of the surface interaction of the cluster beam strongly depends upon gas composition, cluster size, cluster size distribution, and beam energy. Typical argon GCIBs are composed of clustersranging from several hundred to several thousand atoms in size. It has been previously shown that Ar clusters can be used to smooth surfaces at a sub-nanometer level. Argon cluster beam smoothing typically occurs in the energy range between 15 and similar to 30 keV. As such, the average energy per atom is of the order of 10 eV/atom upon cluster impact with the surface andsubsequent dissociation. Ion cluster beams formed with reactive gases suchas oxygen and nitrogen can also be formed, but at somewhat lower current densities than those obtainable with argon. Upon impact, reactive gas clusters undergo strong chemical reactions at the substrate surface. An extensionof this chemical interaction is to utilize reactive clusters in an ion beam-assisted, thin-film physical vapor deposition process. This has been demonstrated with relatively low energy (E < <similar to> 10 keV) oxygen clusters in an electron-beam evaporator to form extremely low resistivity indium-tin oxide films on room-temperature substrates. This paper will describe the basics of GCIB formation and application to atomic scale smoothing of technologically interesting substrates and thin films, as well as reactive GCIB assisted deposition technology. The results presented demonstrate some ofthe unique physics and materials science that can be achieved with an emerging GCIB technology. (C) 2000 Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

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Documento generato il 23/09/20 alle ore 09:30:32