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Titolo:
Sociology and the vernacular voice: text, context and the sociological imagination
Autore:
Williams, R;
Indirizzi:
Univ Durham, Dept Sociol & Social Policy, Durham DH1 3JT, England Univ Durham Durham England DH1 3JT ocial Policy, Durham DH1 3JT, England
Titolo Testata:
HISTORY OF THE HUMAN SCIENCES
fascicolo: 4, volume: 13, anno: 2000,
pagine: 73 - 95
SICI:
0952-6951(200011)13:4<73:SATVVT>2.0.ZU;2-C
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Keywords:
co-construction; dialogue; ethnography; ethnomethodology; interaction;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Arts & Humanities
Citazioni:
113
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Williams, R Univ Durham, Dept Sociol & Social Policy, Durham DH1 3JT, England Univ Durham Durham England DH1 3JT , Durham DH1 3JT, England
Citazione:
R. Williams, "Sociology and the vernacular voice: text, context and the sociological imagination", HIST HUM SC, 13(4), 2000, pp. 73-95

Abstract

Like some other human sciences, sociology has had a recurrent concern to clarify the ambivalent relationship between its professional accounts of social reality on the one hand and lay understandings of social reality on theother. Sociological ethnographers have claimed to accomplish this clarification by including in their accounts both direct representation and responsive interpretation of the vernacular voice of those human subjects whose actions and understandings comprise the focus of their inquiries. I briefly examine some of the practical and textual strategies by which studies have accomplished this. I go on to note that the authenticity of ethnographic work has itself become a matter of dispute on the grounds of the ineradicable asymmetry between the professional voice of the researcher and the vernacular voice of research subjects. Drawing on work in literary theory, anthropology and feminist scholarship, a favoured solution to this problem has argued for the necessity of acknowledging the essentially dialogical character of the relationship between researchers and subjects and also of finding ways to make ethnographic texts reflect this character. This article draws attention to an alternative set of professional practices that prefer 'co-construction' to 'dialogue' as a term of art. Its use encourages and facilitates the close and detailed examination of the multiple ways in which subjects already speak of and for themselves and others within the local sites of their real-world activities. Studies of these matters accord the vernacularvoice of human subjects renewed significance for sociological investigation as part of a radical 'respecification' of prior understandings of the proper relationship between vernacular and professional accounts of social reality. The article assesses the upshot of these claims for the current practice and future prospects of sociology as one of the human sciences.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 09/04/20 alle ore 00:21:27