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Titolo:
Neuropsychological impairments in the recognition of faces, voices, and personal names
Autore:
Neuner, F; Schweinberger, SR;
Indirizzi:
Univ Glasgow, Dept Psychol, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Lanark, Scotland Univ Glasgow Glasgow Lanark Scotland G12 8QQ ow G12 8QQ, Lanark, Scotland Neurol Rehabil Zentrum Godeshohe, Bonn, Germany Neurol Rehabil Zentrum Godeshohe Bonn Germany Godeshohe, Bonn, Germany Univ Konstanz, Erlangen, Germany Univ Konstanz Erlangen GermanyUniv Konstanz, Erlangen, Germany Kliniken Europakanai, Erlangen, Germany Kliniken Europakanai Erlangen Germany en Europakanai, Erlangen, Germany
Titolo Testata:
BRAIN AND COGNITION
fascicolo: 3, volume: 44, anno: 2000,
pagine: 342 - 366
SICI:
0278-2626(200012)44:3<342:NIITRO>2.0.ZU;2-B
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
RIGHT-HEMISPHERE; FAMILIAR FACES; OBJECT AGNOSIA; BRAIN INJURY; PROSOPAGNOSIA; MEMORY; DISCRIMINATION; PERCEPTION; ANOMIA;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
51
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Schweinberger, SR Univ Glasgow, Dept Psychol, 58 Hillhead St, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Lanark, Scotland Univ Glasgow 58 Hillhead St Glasgow Lanark Scotland G12 8QQ
Citazione:
F. Neuner e S.R. Schweinberger, "Neuropsychological impairments in the recognition of faces, voices, and personal names", BRAIN COGN, 44(3), 2000, pp. 342-366

Abstract

In order to determine the dissociability of face, voice, and personal namerecognition, we studied the performance of 36 brain-lesioned patients and 20 control subjects. Participants performed familiarity decisions for portraits, voice samples, and written names of celebrities and unfamiliar people. In those patients who displayed significant impairments in any of these tests, the specificity of these impairments was tested using corresponding object recognition tests (with pictures of objects, environmental sounds, orwritten common words as stimuli). The results showed that 58% of the patients were significantly impaired in at least one test of person recognition. Moreover, 28% of the patients showed impairments that appeared to be specific for people (i.e., performance was preserved in the corresponding objectrecognition test). Three patients showed a deficit that appeared to be confined to the recognition of familiar voices, a pattern that was not described previously. Results were generally consistent with the assumption that impairments in face, voice, and name recognition are dissociable from one another. In contrast, there was no clear evidence for a dissociability between deficits in face and voice naming. The results further suggest that (a) impairments in person recognition after brain lesions may be more common than was thought previously and (b) the patterns of impairment that were observed can be interpreted using current cognitive models of person recognition(Bruce & Young, 1986; Burton, Bruce, & Johnston, 1990). (C) 2000 Academic Press.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 06/04/20 alle ore 07:03:31