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Titolo:
Providing pediatric subspecialty care: A workforce analysis
Autore:
Stoddard, JJ; Cull, WL; Jewett, EAB; Brotherton, SE; Mulvey, HJ; Alden, ER;
Indirizzi:
Amer Acad Pediat, Elk Grove Village, IL USA Amer Acad Pediat Elk Grove Village IL USA iat, Elk Grove Village, IL USA
Titolo Testata:
PEDIATRICS
fascicolo: 6, volume: 106, anno: 2000,
pagine: 1325 - 1333
SICI:
0031-4005(200012)106:6<1325:PPSCAW>2.0.ZU;2-#
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
UNITED-STATES; AMERICAN-SOCIETY; SPECIALTY CARE; FUTURE; ADOLESCENTS; PHYSICIANS; INTERFACE; CHILDREN; DEMAND;
Keywords:
pediatric subspecialty care; workforce analysis;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
22
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Stoddard, JJ Ctr Studying Hlth Syst Change, 600 Maryland Ave SW, Washington, DC 20024 USA Ctr Studying Hlth Syst Change 600 Maryland Ave SW Washington DC USA 20024
Citazione:
J.J. Stoddard et al., "Providing pediatric subspecialty care: A workforce analysis", PEDIATRICS, 106(6), 2000, pp. 1325-1333

Abstract

Objective. To provide a snapshot of pediatric subspecialty practice, examine issues pertaining to the subspecialty workforce, and analyze subspecialists' perspective on the health care market. Background. Before the effort of the Future of Pediatric Education II (FOPE II) Project, very little information existed regarding the characteristics of the pediatric subspecialty workforce. This need was addressed through a comprehensive initiative involving cooperation between subspecialty sections of the American Academy of Pediatrics and other specialty societies. Methods. Questionnaires were sent to all individuals, identified through exhaustive searches, who practiced in 17 pediatric medical and surgical subspecialty areas in 1997 and 1998. The survey elicited information about education and practice issues, including main practice setting, major professional activity, referrals, perceived competition, and local workforce requirements. The number of respondents used in the analyses ranged from 120 (plastic surgery) to 2034 (neonatology). In total, responses from 10 010 pediatric subspecialists were analyzed. Results. For 13 of the subspecialties, a medical school setting was specified by the largest number of respondents within each subspecialty as their main employment site. Direct patient care was the major professional activity of the majority of respondents in all the subspecialties, with the exception of infectious diseases. Large numbers of subspecialists reported increases in the complexity of referral cases, ranging between 20% (cardiology) and 44% (critical care), with an average of 33% across the entire sample. In all subspecialties, a majority of respondents indicated that they faced competition for services in their area (range: 55%-90%; 71% across the entire sample); yet in none of the subspecialties did a majority report that they had modified their practice as a result of competition. In 15 of the 17 subspecialties, a majority stated that there would be no need in their community over the next 3 to 5 years for additional pediatric subspecialists in their discipline. Across the entire sample, 42% of respondents indicated that they or their employer would not be hiring additional, nonreplacement pediatric subspecialists in their field in the next 3 to 5 years (range: 20%-63%). Conclusion. This survey provides the first comprehensive analysis to date on how market forces are perceived to be affecting physicians in the pediatric subspecialty workforce. The data indicate that pediatric subspecialistsin most areas are facing strong competitive pressures in the market, and that the market's ability to support additional subspecialists in many areasmay be diminishing.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 09/07/20 alle ore 12:16:11