Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Post-lesion lateralisation shifts in a computational model of single-word reading
Autore:
Reggia, JA; Gittens, SD; Chhabra, J;
Indirizzi:
Univ Maryland, Dept Comp Sci, College Pk, MD 20742 USA Univ Maryland College Pk MD USA 20742 Comp Sci, College Pk, MD 20742 USA
Titolo Testata:
LATERALITY
fascicolo: 2, volume: 5, anno: 2000,
pagine: 133 - 154
SICI:
1357-650X(200004)5:2<133:PLSIAC>2.0.ZU;2-6
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
RIGHT-HEMISPHERE INVOLVEMENT; CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES; ISCHEMIC STROKE; RECOVERY; APHASIA; SPEECH; LANGUAGE; DIASCHISIS; ACTIVATION; BRAIN;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
67
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Reggia, JA Univ Maryland, Dept Comp Sci, AV Williams Bldg, College Pk, MD 20742 USA Univ Maryland AV Williams Bldg College Pk MD USA 20742 0742 USA
Citazione:
J.A. Reggia et al., "Post-lesion lateralisation shifts in a computational model of single-word reading", LATERALITY, 5(2), 2000, pp. 133-154

Abstract

The mechanisms underlying lateralisation of language are incompletely understood. Existing data is inconclusive, for example, in determining which underlying asymmetries in hemispheric anatomy/physiology lead to lateralisation, the precise role of interhemispheric connections in this process, and exactly how and why lateralisation can shift following focal brain damage. Although these issues will ultimately be settled by experimentation, it is likely that computational modelling can be used to suggest, focus, and even interpret such empirical work. We have recently studied the emergence of lateralisation in an artificial neural network model having paired cerebral hemispheric regions, as the model learned to generate the correct pronunciation for simple words. In this paper we extend this previous work by examining the immediate and longer-term changes in lateralisation that occur following simulated acute hemispheric lesions. Among other things. the results demonstrate that the extent to which the non-lesioned model hemispheric region contributes to recovery is a function of lesion size, prelesion lateralisation, and assumptions about the excitatory/inhibitory influences of the corpus callosum. The relevance of these results to the currently controversial suggestion that language lateralisation shifts following focal damage tolanguage areas, and that the unlesioned hemisphere contributes to recoveryfrom stroke-induced aphasia in adults, is discussed.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 21/01/20 alle ore 07:04:50