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Titolo:
Temporal facilitation for moving stimuli is independent of changes in direction
Autore:
Whitney, D; Cavanagh, P; Murakami, I;
Indirizzi:
Harvard Univ, Vis Sci Lab, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Harvard Univ CambridgeMA USA 02138 Vis Sci Lab, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA NTT, Commun Sci Labs, Human & Informat Sci Lab, Atsugi, Kanagawa 2430198, Japan NTT Atsugi Kanagawa Japan 2430198 ci Lab, Atsugi, Kanagawa 2430198, Japan
Titolo Testata:
VISION RESEARCH
fascicolo: 28, volume: 40, anno: 2000,
pagine: 3829 - 3839
SICI:
0042-6989(2000)40:28<3829:TFFMSI>2.0.ZU;2-H
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
VISUAL-MOTION PERCEPTION; PURSUIT EYE-MOVEMENTS; RANDOM-DOT PATTERNS; CORTICAL AREAS MT; LATENCY DIFFERENCE; APPARENT MOTION; ATTENTION SHIFT; DISCRIMINATION; EXTRAPOLATION; POSITION;
Keywords:
motion; facilitation; latency; direction change; flash lag; extrapolation;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
59
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Whitney, D Harvard Univ, Vis Sci Lab, 33 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Harvard Univ 33 Kirkland St Cambridge MA USA 02138 MA 02138 USA
Citazione:
D. Whitney et al., "Temporal facilitation for moving stimuli is independent of changes in direction", VISION RES, 40(28), 2000, pp. 3829-3839

Abstract

A flash that is presented aligned with a moving stimulus appears to lag behind the position of the moving stimulus. This flash-lag phenomenon reflects a processing advantage for moving stimuli (Metzger, W. (1932) Psychologische Forschung 16, 176-200; MacKay, D. M. (1958) Nature 181, 507-508; Nijhawan, R. (1994) Nature 370, 256-257; Purushothaman, G., Patel, S.S., Bedell, H.E., & Ogmen, H. (1998) Nature 396, 424; Whitney, D. & Murakami, I. (1998)Nature Neuroscience 1, 656-657). The present study measures the sensitivity of the illusion to unpredictable changes in the direction of motion. A moving stimulus translated upwards and then made a 90 degrees turn leftward or rightward. The flash-lag illusion was measured and it was found that, although the change in direction was unpredictable, the flash was still perceived to lag behind the moving stimulus at all points along the trajectory, afinding that is at odds with the extrapolation hypothesis (Nijhawan, R. (1994) Nature 370, 256-257). The results suggest that there is a shorter latency of the neural response to motion even during unpredictable changes in direction. The latency facilitation therefore appears to be omnidirectional rather than specific to a predictable path of motion (Grzywacz, N. M. & Amthor, F. R. (1993) Journal of Neurophysiology 69, 2188-2199). (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 18/09/20 alle ore 18:49:44