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Titolo:
Music training and mental imagery ability
Autore:
Aleman, A; Nieuwenstein, MR; Bocker, KBE; de Haan, EHF;
Indirizzi:
Univ Utrecht, Dept Psychon, Psychol Lab, NL-3584 Utrecht, Netherlands UnivUtrecht Utrecht Netherlands NL-3584 b, NL-3584 Utrecht, Netherlands Univ Utrecht, Helmholtz Inst, Utrecht, Netherlands Univ Utrecht Utrecht Netherlands , Helmholtz Inst, Utrecht, Netherlands
Titolo Testata:
NEUROPSYCHOLOGIA
fascicolo: 12, volume: 38, anno: 2000,
pagine: 1664 - 1668
SICI:
0028-3932(2000)38:12<1664:MTAMIA>2.0.ZU;2-E
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
CORTEX;
Keywords:
music; imagery; temporal lobes;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
20
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Aleman, A Univ Utrecht, Dept Psychon, Psychol Lab, Heidelberglaan 2, NL-3584 Utrecht, Netherlands Univ Utrecht Heidelberglaan 2 Utrecht Netherlands NL-3584 lands
Citazione:
A. Aleman et al., "Music training and mental imagery ability", NEUROPSYCHO, 38(12), 2000, pp. 1664-1668

Abstract

Neuroimaging studies have suggested that the auditory cortex is involved in music processing as well as in auditory imagery. We hypothesized that music training may be associated with improved auditory imagery ability. In this study, performance of musically trained and musically naive subjects wascompared on: (1) a musical mental imagery task (in which subjects had to mentally compare pitches of notes corresponding to lyrics takes from familiar songs); (2) a non-musical auditory imagery task (in which subjects had tomentally compare the acoustic characteristics of everyday sounds); and (3)a comparable measure of visual imagery (in which subjects had to mentally compare visual forms of objectsNeuroimaging studies have suggested that theauditory cortex is involved in music processing as well as in auditory imagery. We hypothesized that music training may be associated with improved auditory imagery ability. In this study, performance of musically trained and musically naive subjects was compared on: (1) a musical mental imagery task tin which subjects had to mentally compare pitches of notes corresponding to lyrics takes from familiar songs); (2) a non-musical auditory imagery task tin which subjects had to mentally compare the acoustic characteristics of everyday sounds); and (3) a comparable measure of visual imagery tin which subjects had to mentally compare visual forms of objects). The musically trained group did not only perform better on the musical imagery task, but also outperformed musically naive subjects on the non-musical auditory imagery task. In contrast, the two groups did not differ on the visual imagery task. This finding is discussed in relation to theoretical proposals about music processing and brain activity. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.). The musically trained group did not only perform better on the musical imagery task, but also outperformed musically naive subjectson the non-musical auditory imagery task. In contrast, the two groups did not differ on the visual imagery task. This finding is discussed in relation to theoretical proposals about music processing and brain activity. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 11/07/20 alle ore 11:02:04