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Titolo:
Background noise differentially effects temporal coding by tonic units in the mouse inferior colliculus
Autore:
Barsz, K; Wilson, WW; Walton, JP;
Indirizzi:
Univ Rochester, Sch Med & Dent, Dept Surg, Otolaryngol Div, Rochester, NY 14642 USA Univ Rochester Rochester NY USA 14642 ryngol Div, Rochester, NY 14642 USA
Titolo Testata:
HEARING RESEARCH
fascicolo: 1-2, volume: 150, anno: 2000,
pagine: 149 - 160
SICI:
0378-5955(200012)150:1-2<149:BNDETC>2.0.ZU;2-U
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
AUDITORY-NERVE FIBERS; GAP DETECTION; HEARING-LOSS; CBA MOUSE; NEURONS; RESPONSES; REPRESENTATION; CHINCHILLA; MODULATION; SINUSOIDS;
Keywords:
inferior colliculus; CBA mouse; temporal processing; background noise; tonic unit;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
29
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Walton, JP Univ Rochester, Sch Med & Dent, Dept Surg, Otolaryngol Div, POB629, Rochester, NY 14642 USA Univ Rochester POB 629 Rochester NY USA 14642ter, NY 14642 USA
Citazione:
K. Barsz et al., "Background noise differentially effects temporal coding by tonic units in the mouse inferior colliculus", HEARING RES, 150(1-2), 2000, pp. 149-160

Abstract

In natural environments, temporally complex signals often occur in a background of noise. The neural mechanisms underlying the preservation of temporal sensitivity in background noise are poorly understood. In the present study, we examined the ability of inferior colliculus (IC) units with primary-like and sustained response patterns ('tonic units') to encode silent gapsin quiet and in background noise, Minimum gap thresholds (MGTs), the shortest silent gap in a noise burst evoking a neural response, were measured inquiet and background noise for 34 IC units. Units were classified as background noise resistant (BNR; MGT did not change in background noise) or background noise sensitive (BNS; MGTs became elevated in background noise). In quiet, the MGTs of BNR and BNS units were comparable and both types of units encoded the gap by a cessation of activity during the gap. The addition of background noise had little effect on the response rate of BNR units either during or after the gap stimulus. In contrast, for BNS units, backgroundnoise reduced the response rate during the gap stimulus while increasing the response rate after the gap stimulus. Background noise also altered the first spike latency of BNS units. For BNS units, the mean first spike latency was no longer inversely related to BF, but this relationship was maintained in BNR units. These results suggest that the response of BNS units to background noise obliterates their response to the gap stimulus. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 01/12/20 alle ore 22:28:04