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Titolo:
The impact of gender and age on attitudes and reactions to unemployment: The Israeli case
Autore:
Kulik, L;
Indirizzi:
Bar Ilan Univ, Sch Social Work, Ramat Gan, Israel Bar Ilan Univ Ramat Gan Israel Univ, Sch Social Work, Ramat Gan, Israel
Titolo Testata:
SEX ROLES
fascicolo: 1-2, volume: 43, anno: 2000,
pagine: 85 - 104
SICI:
0360-0025(200007)43:1-2<85:TIOGAA>2.0.ZU;2-Q
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
COPING BEHAVIORS; SEX-DIFFERENCES; JOB LOSS; VALUES; SATISFACTION; PERCEPTIONS; STRESS; LENGTH; WOMEN; MEN;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
50
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Kulik, L Bar Ilan Univ, Sch Social Work, Ramat Gan, Israel Bar Ilan Univ Ramat Gan Israel Social Work, Ramat Gan, Israel
Citazione:
L. Kulik, "The impact of gender and age on attitudes and reactions to unemployment: The Israeli case", SEX ROLES, 43(1-2), 2000, pp. 85-104

Abstract

The research examined the impact of gender and age on attitudes and reactions to joblessness among 613 unemployed individuals in Israel (aged 21-60 years). With regard to ethnicity, most of the participants were born in Israel and the remainder were evenly distributed between Europe-America and Asia-Africa. The majority of participants had at least secondary education. Onthe whole, results indicated that both gender and age had significant effects, but did not interact. Furthermore, there was little significant interaction between marital status and gender Despite recent changes in women's orientations toward work, gender differences are still evident in relation to unemployment: (1) women tend to reject jobs more readily than men on the basis of job content, working conditions, conflicts between job requirements and family obligations, and masculine-typed work, and (2) men tend to devote more time per week to job hunting. As these differences are not age related and are partly independent of marital status, it can be argued that they stem from generalized social expectations regarding gender roles (men asbreadwinners and women as responsible for the home) to which unemployed men and women adjust themselves even before they actually fill these roles. In addition, the following age differences were apparent: (1) middle-aged unemployed reported spending more time looking for work than did members of the younger groups, (2) the youngest group saw advantages in unemployment inthat it left them time to devote to themselves and also reported the leastdeterioration in health as a result of unemployment, and (3) young people were more likely to believe that others have no respect for the unemployed,yet preferred to be out of work than to accept a low-paying job.

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Documento generato il 30/11/20 alle ore 16:39:43