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Titolo:
Musical hallucinosis in acquired deafness - Phenomenology and brain substrate
Autore:
Griffiths, TD;
Indirizzi:
Univ Newcastle Upon Tyne, Dept Neurol, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, Tyne &Wear, England Univ Newcastle Upon Tyne Newcastle Upon Tyne Tyne & Wear England NE1 7RU Inst Neurol, Wellcome Dept Cognit Neurol, London WC1N 3BG, England Inst Neurol London England WC1N 3BG nit Neurol, London WC1N 3BG, England
Titolo Testata:
BRAIN
, volume: 123, anno: 2000,
parte:, 10
pagine: 2065 - 2076
SICI:
0006-8950(200010)123:<2065:MHIAD->2.0.ZU;2-P
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
FUNCTIONAL NEUROANATOMY; AUDITORY HALLUCINATIONS; PLANUM TEMPORALE; PERCEPTION; SOUND; PITCH; PET; REPRESENTATION; TINNITUS; IMAGERY;
Keywords:
music hallucination; deafness; functional imaging; PET;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
34
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Griffiths, TD Univ Newcastle Upon Tyne, Sch Med, Dept Physiol Sci, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE2 4HH, Tyne & Wear, England Univ Newcastle Upon Tyne Newcastle Upon Tyne Tyne & Wear England NE2 4HH
Citazione:
T.D. Griffiths, "Musical hallucinosis in acquired deafness - Phenomenology and brain substrate", BRAIN, 123, 2000, pp. 2065-2076

Abstract

Six subjects with musical hallucinations following acquired deafness are described. The subjects all experienced the condition in the absence of any other features to suggest epilepsy or psychosis. I propose a neuropsychological model for the condition consistent with detailed observation of the subjects' phenomenology. The model is based on spontaneous activity within a cognitive module for the analysis of temporal pattern in segmented sound. Functional imaging was carried out to test the hypothesis that musical hallucinosis is due to activity within such a module, for which the neural substrate is a distributed network distinct from the primary auditory cortex. PET was carried out on the six subjects to identify areas where brain activity increased as a function of the severity of the hallucination. In a group analysis, no effect was demonstrated in the primary auditory cortices. Clusters of correlated activity were demonstrated in the posterior temporal lobes, the right basal ganglia, the cerebellum and the inferior frontal cortices. This network is similar to that previously demonstrated during the normal perception and imagery of patterned-segmented sound, and is consistent with the proposed neuropsychological and neural mechanism.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 22/01/20 alle ore 09:32:16