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Titolo:
Upper airway muscle responsiveness to rising Pco(2) during NREM sleep
Autore:
Pillar, G; Malhotra, A; Fogel, RB; Beauregard, J; Slamowitz, DI; Shea, SA; White, DP;
Indirizzi:
Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Sleep Disorders Sect, Div Endocrinol, Boston, MA 02115 USA Brigham & Womens Hosp Boston MA USA 02115 ndocrinol, Boston, MA 02115 USA Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Sleep Disorders Sect, Div Pulm & Crit Care Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA Brigham & Womens Hosp Boston MA USA 02115 Care Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA Harvard Univ Boston MA USA 02115 vard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY
fascicolo: 4, volume: 89, anno: 2000,
pagine: 1275 - 1282
SICI:
8750-7587(200010)89:4<1275:UAMRTR>2.0.ZU;2-D
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
NORMAL MEN; GENIOGLOSSAL ELECTROMYOGRAM; NEUROMUSCULAR ACTIVITY; NEGATIVE-PRESSURE; APNEA PATIENTS; RESISTANCE; HUMANS; CO2; COLLAPSIBILITY; HYPERCAPNIA;
Keywords:
obstructive sleep apnea syndrome; dilator muscle; genioglossus; hypercapnia; slow-wave sleep; nonrapid eye movement;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
36
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: White, DP Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Sleep Disorders Sect, Div Endocrinol, RF 485,221 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA Brigham & Womens Hosp RF 485,221 Longwood Ave Boston MA USA 02115
Citazione:
G. Pillar et al., "Upper airway muscle responsiveness to rising Pco(2) during NREM sleep", J APP PHYSL, 89(4), 2000, pp. 1275-1282

Abstract

Although pharyngeal muscles respond robustly to increasing PCO2, during wakefulness, the effect of hypercapnia on upper airway muscle activation during sleep has not been carefully assessed. This may be important, because ithas been hypothesized that CO2-driven muscle activation may importantly stabilize the upper airway during stages 3 and 4 sleep. To test this hypothesis, we measured ventilation, airway resistance, genioglossus (GG) and tensor palatini (TP) electromyogram (EMG), plus end-tidal PCO2 (PETCO2) in 18 subjects during wakefulness, stage 2, and slow-wave sleep (SWS). Responses ofventilation and muscle EMG to administered CO2 (PETCO2 = 6 Torr above the eupneic level) were also assessed during SWS (n = 9) or stage 2 sleep (n. =7). PETCO2 increased spontaneously by 0.8 +/- 0.1 Torr from stage 2 to SWS(from 43.3 +/- 0.6 to 44.1 +/- 0.5 Torr, P < 0.05), with no significant change in GG or TP EMG. Despite a significant increase in minute ventilation with induced hypercapnia (from 8.3 +/- 0.1 to 11.9 +/- 0.3 l/min in stage 2and 8.6 +/- 0.4 to 12.7 +/- 0.4 l/min in SWS, P < 0.05 for both), there was no significant change in the GG or TP EMG. These data indicate that supraphysiological levels of PETCO2 (50.4 +/- 1.6 Torr in stage 2, and 50.4 +/- 0.9 Torr in SWS) are not a major independent stimulus to pharyngeal dilatormuscle activation during either SWS or stage 2 sleep. Thus hypercapnia-induced pharyngeal dilator muscle activation alone is unlikely to explain the paucity of sleep-disordered breathing events during SWS.

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Documento generato il 04/04/20 alle ore 09:03:03