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Titolo:
Human frequency-following response: Representation of tonal sweeps
Autore:
Krishnan, A; Parkinson, J;
Indirizzi:
Purdue Univ, Dept Audiol & Speech Sci, Auditory Electrophysiol Lab, W Lafayette, IN 47907 USA Purdue Univ W Lafayette IN USA 47907 ysiol Lab, W Lafayette, IN 47907 USA Univ Tennessee, Dept Audiol & Speech Pathol, Auditory Electrophysiol Lab, Knoxville, TN USA Univ Tennessee Knoxville TN USA ry Electrophysiol Lab, Knoxville, TN USA
Titolo Testata:
AUDIOLOGY AND NEURO-OTOLOGY
fascicolo: 6, volume: 5, anno: 2000,
pagine: 312 - 321
SICI:
1420-3030(200011/12)5:6<312:HFRROT>2.0.ZU;2-K
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
AUDITORY-NERVE FIBERS; STEADY-STATE VOWELS; DISCHARGE PATTERNS; COCHLEAR NUCLEUS; EVOKED-POTENTIALS; UNIT RESPONSES; PITCH; TONES;
Keywords:
neural phase locking; steady-state vowels; time-variant vowels;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
33
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Krishnan, A Purdue Univ, Dept Audiol & Speech Sci, Auditory ElectrophysiolLab, 1353 Heavilon Hall, W Lafayette, IN 47907 USA Purdue Univ 1353 Heavilon Hall W Lafayette IN USA 47907 07 USA
Citazione:
A. Krishnan e J. Parkinson, "Human frequency-following response: Representation of tonal sweeps", AUDIOL NEUR, 5(6), 2000, pp. 312-321

Abstract

Auditory nerve single-unit population studies have demonstrated that phaselocking plays a dominant role in the neural encoding of steady-state speech sounds. Recently, we have reported that the phase-locked activity underlying the human frequency-following response (FFR) could also encode the first two formants of several tonal approximations of steady-state vowels. Since auditory nerve single-unit population studies have also demonstrated thatphase locking is used to represent time-varying speech-like sounds, it wasreasoned that the phase-locked neural activity underlying the human FFR, likewise, is dynamic enough to represent time-varying sounds. FFRs to a rising and a falling tone were obtained from 8 normal-hearing adults at 95, 85,75 and 65 dB nHL, Results clearly demonstrated that the human FFR does indeed follow the trajectory of the rising and falling tones. Also, amplitude changes in the FFR supported the view that neural phase locking decreases with increasing frequency. Finally, the relatively smaller FFR amplitude forthe falling tone compared to its rising counterpart lends further support to the notion that rising tones produce greater neural synchrony than falling tones. These results indicate that the human FFR may be used to evaluateencoding of time-varying speech sounds like diphthongs and certain consonant-vowel syllables. Copyright (C) 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

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Documento generato il 01/12/20 alle ore 07:47:48