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Titolo:
Effect of patient reminder/recall interventions on immunization rates - A review
Autore:
Szilagyi, PG; Bordley, C; Vann, JC; Chelminski, A; Kraus, RM; Margolis, PA; Rodewald, LE;
Indirizzi:
Univ Rochester, Sch Med & Dent, Dept Pediat, Rochester, NY 14642 USA Univ Rochester Rochester NY USA 14642 ept Pediat, Rochester, NY 14642 USA Univ N Carolina, Dept Pediat, Childrens Primary Care Res Grp, Chapel Hill,NC USA Univ N Carolina Chapel Hill NC USA mary Care Res Grp, Chapel Hill,NC USA Univ N Carolina, Sch Publ Hlth, Publ Hlth Leadership Program, Chapel Hill,NC USA Univ N Carolina Chapel Hill NC USA eadership Program, Chapel Hill,NC USA Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Natl Immunizat Program, Atlanta, GA USA Ctr DisControl & Prevent Atlanta GA USA unizat Program, Atlanta, GA USA
Titolo Testata:
JAMA-JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
fascicolo: 14, volume: 284, anno: 2000,
pagine: 1820 - 1827
SICI:
0098-7484(20001011)284:14<1820:EOPRIO>2.0.ZU;2-6
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
COMPUTER-GENERATED REMINDERS; INFLUENZA VACCINATION RATES; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL; INNER-CITY; PRIMARY-CARE; CHILDHOOD IMMUNIZATION; SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS; POSTCARD REMINDERS; PUBLICATION BIAS; PREVENTIVE CARE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
70
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Szilagyi, PG Univ Rochester, Sch Med & Dent, Strong Mem Hosp, Box 632,601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 USA Univ Rochester Box 632,601 Elmwood AveRochester NY USA 14642
Citazione:
P.G. Szilagyi et al., "Effect of patient reminder/recall interventions on immunization rates - A review", J AM MED A, 284(14), 2000, pp. 1820-1827

Abstract

Context Immunization rates for children and adults remain below national goals. While experts recommend that health care professionals remind patients of needed immunizations, few practitioners actually use reminders. Littleis known about the effectiveness of reminders in different settings or patient populations. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of patient reminder systems in improving immunization rates, and to compare the effectiveness of different types of reminders for a variety of patient populations. Data Sources A search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, Sociological Abstracts, and CAB Health Abstracts. Relevant articles, as well aspublished abstracts, conference proceedings, and tiles of study collaborators, were searched for relevant references. Study Selection and Data Extraction English-language studies involving patient reminder/recall interventions (using criteria established by the Cochrane Collaboration) were eligible for review if they involved randomized controlled trials, controlled before-after studies, or interrupted time series, and measured immunization rates. Of 109 studies identified, 41 met eligibility criteria. Studies were reviewed independently by 2 reviewers using a standardized checklist. Results of studies are expressed as absolute percentage-point changes in immunization rates and as odds ratios (ORs). Studies with similar characteristics of patients or interventions were pooled (random effects model). Data Synthesis Patient reminder systems were effective in improving immunization rates in 33 (80%) of the 41 studies, irrespective of baseline immunization rates, patient age, setting, or vaccination type. Increases in immunization rates due to reminders ranged from 5 to 20 percentage points. Reminders were effective for childhood Vaccinations (OR, 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49-2.72), childhood influenza vaccinations (OR, 4.25; 95% CI, 2.10-8.60), adult pneumococcus or tetanus vaccinations (OR, 5.14; 95% CI,1.21-21.78), and adult influenza vaccinations (OR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.69-3.10)? While reminders were most effective in academic settings (OR, 3.33; 95% CI, 1.98-5.58), they were also highly effective in private practice set tings (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.45-2.22) and public health clinics (OR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.42-3.07). All types of reminders were effective (postcards, letters, and telephone or autodialer calls), with telephone reminders being most effective but costliest. Conclusions Patient reminder systems in primary care settings are effective in improving immunization rates. Primary care physicians should use patient reminders to improve immunization delivery.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 10/07/20 alle ore 11:25:56