Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Habitat type as a determinant of species range sizes: the example of lotic-lentic differences in aquatic Coleoptera
Autore:
Ribera, I; Vogler, AP;
Indirizzi:
Nat Hist Museum, Dept Entomol, London SW7 5BD, England Nat Hist Museum London England SW7 5BD Entomol, London SW7 5BD, England Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Dept Biol, Ascot SL5 7PY, Berks, England Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med Ascot Berks England SL5 7PY d
Titolo Testata:
BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY
fascicolo: 1, volume: 71, anno: 2000,
pagine: 33 - 52
SICI:
0024-4066(200009)71:1<33:HTAADO>2.0.ZU;2-F
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
GROUND BEETLES COLEOPTERA; RAIN-FOREST STREAMS; GENETIC DIFFERENTIATION; DERONECTES-GROUP; DYTISCIDAE; PATTERNS; PHYLOGENY; DISPERSAL; AUSTRALIA; CARABIDAE;
Keywords:
habitat persistence; water flow; rarity; cladogenesis; species richness; endemicity;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
70
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Vogler, AP Nat Hist Museum, Dept Entomol, Cromwell Rd, London SW7 5BD, England Nat Hist Museum Cromwell Rd London England SW7 5BD BD, England
Citazione:
I. Ribera e A.P. Vogler, "Habitat type as a determinant of species range sizes: the example of lotic-lentic differences in aquatic Coleoptera", BIOL J LINN, 71(1), 2000, pp. 33-52

Abstract

Species differ in the size of their geographical ranges, but it is unclearhow this is affected by the intrinsic properties of various habitat types. Using data on range sizes for 490 species of aquatic Coleoptera from the Iberian Peninsula we show that running-water (lotic) species have much smaller distributional ranges than those occurring in standing water (lentic). This robust association of habitat type and range size has independently arisen in at least four monophyletic coleopteran lineages, in Hydradephaga, Hydrophiloidea, Hydraenidae and Byrrhoidea, and several more times within these main groups. We propose that this pattern is due to different evolutionary dynamics of both habitat types: stagnant water bodies are more likely tocompletely disappear, requiring frequent migration of resident populations. Rivers and streams, on the contrary, have more temporal and spatial continuity, and therefore permit the long-term persistence of local populations. In less permanent habitats species will require a greater geographical mobility, which indirectly results in a larger size range. The less dispersivepopulations of running water should also have reduced gene flow, increasing the probability of allopatric speciation, and thus reducing the average range of more widespread ancestral species. These differences in population parameters, and the frequency of transitions between the two habitat types,may have strong macroevolutionary consequences, in particular regarding speciation rates and possible morphological specializations. (C) 2000 The Linnean Society of London.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 18/09/20 alle ore 19:15:58